Rapid transit – Support Transit http://supporttransit.org/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 12:30:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://supporttransit.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-8-120x120.png Rapid transit – Support Transit http://supporttransit.org/ 32 32 Portland’s new bus rapid transit line is many things. But is it faster? https://supporttransit.org/portlands-new-bus-rapid-transit-line-is-many-things-but-is-it-faster/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 12:30:00 +0000 https://supporttransit.org/portlands-new-bus-rapid-transit-line-is-many-things-but-is-it-faster/ In the 1994 Hollywood blockbuster The rapiditySandra Bullock and Keanu Reeves take drastic measures to keep a city bus moving at at least 80 km/h: blowing red lights, jumping a drawbridge, crashing into a jet plane. No such fiery drama was on view last week as state, city and county leaders gathered at Portland Community […]]]>

In the 1994 Hollywood blockbuster The rapiditySandra Bullock and Keanu Reeves take drastic measures to keep a city bus moving at at least 80 km/h: blowing red lights, jumping a drawbridge, crashing into a jet plane.

No such fiery drama was on view last week as state, city and county leaders gathered at Portland Community College’s Southeast campus to celebrate the arrival of the long-awaited row.” Bus Rapid Transit” from TriMet on Southeast Division Street.

But Keanu’s old dilemma – keeping the bus moving at base speed – lurked around the edges of the happy scene.

After nine years and $175 million, the Frequent Express 2, or FX2 for short, replaces the existing Line 2 with fewer stops, new 60-foot articulated buses and timed signals.

Officials announce the project as a way out of a difficult impasse that transit planners in the region currently face. As the population grew, ridership declined, which worsened traffic congestion. TriMet badly needs new projects like FX2 to attract cyclists with the promise of escaping traffic jams in state-of-the-art comfort.

That’s why TriMet promised that the new project would result in faster driving. A Q&A posted on its website in 2016 estimated a 15% to 20% decrease in travel times.

But in order to provide a faster ride, TriMet had to compromise.

The agency dropped plans to extend the road to Mt. Hood Community College, which would have attracted a new cohort of cyclists. It also changed the route to cross the inner divide after initial plans to use Southeast Powell Boulevard proved too slow and costly. And it closed dozens of bus stops along Line 2, including many in East Portland and Gresham.

For all that, it’s unclear just how much faster TriMet’s new bus line really is.

Due to congestion and other compromises imposed on the project by TriMet planners, the bus is not faster for all routes, WW found, especially compared to transit times when the project was first announced.

In 2013, it took at most 66 minutes to travel from the Gresham Transit Center to the Taylor Street stop in downtown Portland.

It now takes 67 minutes to use the new rapid transit line during peak hours.

“It’s really hilarious,” says Kem Marks, a transit advocate who sat on the project’s steering committee in 2014. “The goal was to get people going farther and faster.”

Granted, Line 2 has gotten slower in recent years as the division has grown and the pandemic has sent commuters back to their cars. FX2 offers relief, said TriMet spokeswoman Roberta Altstadt. “FX offers faster rides for the vast majority of riders,” she says, pointing to the section of the route between 82nd and 162nd avenues southeast, which is now 29% faster than the local line. .

But in response to questions from WW as to whether the line met its speed targets, TriMet said it had “strayed” from the 20% claim. The agency no longer has a contract with the company that made that estimate and was unable to update it, Altstadt says.

In fact, TriMet no longer wants the line to be called “Bus Rapid Transit,” even though that’s how it referred to the line in its federal grant application and in 2020 promotional materials on its site. website.

The term is notoriously difficult to define. People associate BRT with dedicated bus lanes, says Altstadt, which FX2 only has in limited places.

In 2009, Metro regional government planners brainstormed options for expanding high-speed transit in Portland. They made a short list. At the top was the Highway 26 corridor in East Portland.

Rather than chasing the billions of dollars needed to build the light rail — as the agency unsuccessfully tried to do in 2020 when it tried to raise money to build a new line to Tualatin — planners focused on improving buses. They would be faster to build and cheaper.

Metro then assembled a steering committee of 22 local politicians, decision makers and community advocates. They spent two years working out the details with TriMet planners.

The committee quickly agreed on a “preferred” route, which would extend the line from Mt. Hood Community College to the South Waterfront. The key to the route’s success, committee members said in a summary of the meeting, was “significantly faster travel.”

Achieving this goal, planners quickly realized, was going to be a challenge. Despite the dedicated bus lane, the detour through the South Waterfront costs time. So did the buses that maneuvered down congested 82nd Avenue to get to Powell Boulevard.

Planners warned the committee that the new line is expected to be slower than the line it replaced, committee members said. WW.

To compete for a federal grant, TriMet needed the new FX2 line to go faster than the older Division Street Line 2 it was replacing, while staying on budget. So he removed the Powell Boulevard detour and, as a cost-cutting measure, scaled back the Mt. Hood Community College extension.

The result? Buses travel faster up and down the split, at least until they reach the detour over the Tilikum Crossing Bridge or freight traffic on the Pacific Union lanes.

But these advantages come at a cost: the bus stops have disappeared.

It was a controversial issue in 2015 as Metro planned the line. “We heard person after person after person come in and talk to the steering committee about how they didn’t want to lose stops that were right next to their house,” says Michael Calcagno, former Mt. Hood Community College and member of the steering committee.

TriMet planners took the criticism seriously, but stressed that speeding up the bus was necessary to secure federal funding. Without removing the stops, Calcagno recalls, “there wouldn’t be a rapid transit line because we wouldn’t have federal funding. The testimony was somewhat questionable.

TriMet says the eliminated stops had minimal effects. “All but 1% riders will find a station within a few blocks of their current stop,” the agency says.

But Gresham’s blocks can be long and lost saves had a big effect on John Bildsoe’s home. He represented the Gresham Coalition of Neighborhood Associations on the steering committee and lives next to one of the eliminated stops. Before FX2, her kids walked to the bus stop to get to PCC and Portland State University.

But that stop is gone and the result, at least for the Bildsoe family, is fewer bus passengers.

“I find it cheaper and faster to get cars for my kids,” says Bildsoe.

Vivian Satterfield, who served on the committee and is now director of the nonprofit Verde, explains why she ultimately backed the compromise. “I will never vote against public transit,” Satterfield says, “especially when this region is looking to increase its transit capacity by applying for federal funds.

But some aspects of the final proposal still bother her. She thinks the lack of dedicated bus lanes the entire route and the decision to steer away from Mt. Hood Community College and Powell Boulevard are going to be significant barriers to increasing ridership.

“We need people to use public transit,” says Satterfield, but she remains “skeptical” that the new line will attract enough ridership to “show the success” of the BRT concept.

For Duncan Hwang, director of the Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon, the benefits of the project go beyond just a faster bus.

“When viewed holistically as a community development project rather than just a transit project, we have achieved real benefits for East Portland,” he says.

He ticked off the victories: the construction contract for the project was awarded to a majority black company, Raimore Construction. New sidewalks and lighting have made Division Street safer and more walkable. Mt. Hood Community College also won concessions, including faster service on a nearby bus line.

On a recent Friday afternoon, commuters on FX2’s 4523 bus said they were pleased with the new service. The buses were clean and spacious – and at least a little faster.

Jason Rohman was returning from his job at an environmental restoration company in Tigard. The new route had cut his commute by six minutes, he said.

That afternoon, Todd Pomerening was behind the wheel. He used to drive the line when it was a local route and said the new express service was an improvement.

The biggest complaint he heard from riders was the eliminated stops.

“Overall, I think it’s going to be a lot better,” Pomerening said, “at least once people get used to it.”

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Birmingham Xpress Launches Alabama’s First Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) Service https://supporttransit.org/birmingham-xpress-launches-alabamas-first-bus-rapid-transit-brt-service/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 17:06:53 +0000 https://supporttransit.org/birmingham-xpress-launches-alabamas-first-bus-rapid-transit-brt-service/ City of Birmingham leaders joined officials and employees of the Birmingham-Jefferson County Transit Authority (BJCTA) for the ground-breaking launch of Birmingham Xpress, Alabama’s first bus rapid transit (BRT) system . The ceremony, held Sept. 22 at the CrossPlex Transit Center in the Five Points West neighborhood, was attended by about 150 people, including representatives from […]]]>

City of Birmingham leaders joined officials and employees of the Birmingham-Jefferson County Transit Authority (BJCTA) for the ground-breaking launch of Birmingham Xpress, Alabama’s first bus rapid transit (BRT) system . The ceremony, held Sept. 22 at the CrossPlex Transit Center in the Five Points West neighborhood, was attended by about 150 people, including representatives from the federal and community partners of the $64 million project.

“We have to get people from point A to point B on time,” Birmingham Mayor Randall Woodfin said. “The city is in the service industry, and it’s critical that we get people to jobs, healthcare and school, as well as retail and entertainment opportunities. Today marks a major milestone in public transport for the city of Birmingham.

Birmingham City Council Speaker Wardine Alexander noted that Birmingham Xpress will use bus-only lanes and special technology to provide “fast, reliable and cost-effective transport”. She likened the service to a “light rail on rubber wheels,” offering rail-like efficiency with the flexibility of a bus to connect neighborhoods along a 10-mile east/west corridor.

“It provides connectivity between our residents, new opportunities and multiple services,” said Alexander.

Birmingham Xpress includes 32 stops traveling between the Woodlawn Transit Center, located across 1st Avenue North from Woodlawn High School, and the CrossPlex Transit Center. It provides access to many of the city’s most visited attractions and services – Sloss Furnaces, McWane Science Center, Alabama and Lyric Theaters, Railroad Park, Regions Field, the Negro Southern League Museum, Red Mountain Theatre, Bartow Arena, Rickwood Field , Bill Harris Arena and Birmingham CrossPlex – as well as the University of Alabama at the Birmingham campus; Brookwood Princeton, the Children’s of Alabama and UAB hospitals, numerous libraries and recreation centers, and the neighborhood business districts of Avondale, Woodlawn, and 4th Avenue North.

Funding for Birmingham Xpress came from the city and the Federal Transit Administration (FTA). Birmingham provided $44 million, with $18 million of that total provided by the American Rescue Plan Act, while FTA contributed $20 million.

The new service is the latest addition to a growing selection of public transport services in Birmingham which includes the BJCTA’s Max, Magic City Connector and paratransit services, the Ride Share service provided by Birmingham On-Demand, micromobility options such as the scooter and Complete streets with space for walkers and cyclists. Birmingham Xpress uses high-capacity, low-emission or zero-emission buses that feature ground-level boarding to easily accommodate wheelchairs and other disabled users. The buses offer free internet service and chargers for mobile devices.

In addition to the predicted economic impacts of Birmingham Xpress, speakers James Fowler, Director of Birmingham’s Department of Transport, and Dr Yvette Taylor, FTA Region 4 Administrator, touted the role more efficient buses can play in the reduction of greenhouse gases and the fight against climate change. BJCTA executive director Charlotte Shaw noted that the launch of the system is a moment Birmingham should be proud of.

Birmingham Xpress buses now operate in the city. (Mark Kelly/Alabama Press Center)

“Birmingham is no stranger to change and transformation,” Shaw said. “Change does not necessarily mean growth, but growth means change. Our mission is to connect people to places and our vision is to contribute to the quality of life of communities. This is just the beginning.

Birmingham Xpress hours of operation will be Monday to Friday 5 a.m. to 11 p.m. and Saturday 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Xpress buses do not run on Sundays. The service will be free for the first 30 days – a period during which supporters hope local users will learn what the new service has to offer.

“We have to use it,” Woodfin said. “We have to embrace it and make sure it works for everyone. Please use it – and please tell a friend.

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Two Bus Rapid Transit Concepts Announced As Part Of SGV Transit Feasibility Study – Streetsblog Los Angeles https://supporttransit.org/two-bus-rapid-transit-concepts-announced-as-part-of-sgv-transit-feasibility-study-streetsblog-los-angeles/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 19:23:09 +0000 https://supporttransit.org/two-bus-rapid-transit-concepts-announced-as-part-of-sgv-transit-feasibility-study-streetsblog-los-angeles/ San Gabriel Valley Phase 1 Transit Feasibility Study is complete. Community workshops were held on Tuesday to present conceptual routes for bus rapid transit – and other “transit priority corridors” where BRT lanes will not be developed. These zero-emission bus routes would have priority at traffic lights, use reserved right-of-way lanes, make limited stops at […]]]>

San Gabriel Valley Phase 1 Transit Feasibility Study is complete. Community workshops were held on Tuesday to present conceptual routes for bus rapid transit – and other “transit priority corridors” where BRT lanes will not be developed.

These zero-emission bus routes would have priority at traffic lights, use reserved right-of-way lanes, make limited stops at upgraded stations, and offer frequent all-day service in both directions. They would be located in Metro’s”Equity-Driven Communitiesin the lower San Gabriel Valley, which lacks high-quality public transit.

Two alignments are recommended for short-term implementation (within 10 to 15 years): Valley Boulevard and Rosemead Boulevard. To see the red lines below.

The draft visionary plan for <a class=bus rapid transit, including the Valley Blvd and Rosemead Blvd concepts.” width=”1228″/>
The draft visionary plan for bus rapid transit, including the Valley Blvd and Rosemead Blvd concepts.

East-West – Valley Boulevard

Looking at the Valley Blvd route from Union Station to the Pomona Transit Center, one quickly notices that only the middle part of Valley is marked red for dedicated lanes (Phase 1 BRT). West of El Monte is blue (Rapid Bus Priority Corridor) meaning there will be no bus lanes there. On the contrary, this section of the valley could have “express services with fewer stops and higher speeds”.

The technical project manager of the study, Brent Ogden, said this was because Valley Blvd in San Gabriel “is being reconfigured to handle higher levels of automobile traffic.” Planned improvements in this area essentially prevent the conversion of bus lanes […] their goal is to move cars and move trucks.

The Valley Blvd concept was preferred among three potential east-west concepts due to higher projected traffic (in 2042). However, some parts of the other concepts were not entirely abandoned.

West of the El Monte bus station there are options (marked in pink) for the development of bus lanes on the way to the Atlantic station of the Metro Gold Line in East LA (near Monterey Park): either Garvey Avenue to Atlantic Boulevard, or Garvey to Potrero Grande Drive to Pomona Blvd.

To the east, Valley Road climbs to Hacienda Boulevard in the Industry/La Puente neighborhood. It is not yet determined whether the study will ultimately recommend an east-west path from Valley and Hacienda, or several, but there are two options in pink (each route is on either side of the train tracks in City of Industry):

  1. The BRT stays on Valley, takes a brief detour down Grand Avenue to Temple Avenue, with stops at Mt. San Antonio College and Cal Poly Pomona, and joins Valley where it becomes Holt Avenue in Pomona, terminating at the Transit Center from Pomona.
  2. At Hacienda, the BRT heads south to Colima Road (passing the many malls of Puente Hills and Rowland Heights), then to Golden Springs Drive at Diamond Bar, and back north to Mission Boulevard, ending at Pomona Transit Center.

It should be noted that the working map of the draft vision plan also includes a priority corridor for rapid buses (blue) along the entire length of Amar Road from Bassett to Mt. SAC.

North-South – Rosemead Boulevard

The other red The line on the map is Rosemead Blvd, going a bit north, but mostly south of Garvey. To the north of the valley, however, the concept changes from a dedicated BRT track to a bluetransit priority corridor” extending to the Sierra Madre Villa Gold Line stations. The map shows four other north-south “transit priority corridors” that terminate at Gold Line stations near the foothills of San Gabriel Mountain. At their southern ends, they run to the Gateway Cities, East LA and North OC.

Ogden explained the reason for favoring a short-term BRT project on Rosemead Blvd: “It was by far the most popular service to generate the most ridership, and then it kind of drops off as you go down the road. ‘is. [Santa Anita/Peck] coming in about two-thirds of Rosemead, then maybe 50% of that with Azusa and Citrus-Grand. The reason traffic is lower in the east is that densities are just lower in terms of population, employment […] land use declines in the east.

Preliminary Ridership Comparisons for North-South Concepts in the SGV Transit Feasibility Study.  Note that the idea of ​​adding investments to Atlantic/Fair Oaks came after the traffic comparisons.
Preliminary Ridership Comparisons for North-South Concepts in the SGV Transit Feasibility Study. Note that the idea of ​​adding investments to Atlantic/Fair Oaks came after the traffic comparisons.

Subway or Foothill?

Some asked during the workshop how the routes would be broken down by agency. “The Subway service area is basically on the 605, and then the Foothill service area is basically east of the 605.” Ogden said. “So North-South services, we would expect operators to operate the services that fall within their district. For East-West services, cooperation would be necessary. One of the two operators could choose to provide the service and the other could potentially enter into a cost-sharing agreement to provide direct service, or it is even possible that in the short term there will be a transfer of service to El Monte. ”

Funding and cost projection

$635.5 million has been set aside from Measure R for public transit improvements resulting from this study. The SGV Council of Governments website states that “the […] The Transit Feasibility Study was initiated following the Metro Board’s decision in February 2020 to remove the alternative to State Route 60 in the Eastside Transit Corridor Phase 2 project to extend the Metro L line (Gold ).

Together, the Valley and Rosemead concepts are expected to cost between $615 million and $905 million. This is without counting if several east-west roads are built. Ogden said with the $635 million, “We can definitely do maybe some east-west segments and some north-south segments […] we can certainly afford to develop this type of program in the San Gabriel Valley. See the table below for what is estimated to be within budget.

Costs of BRT ElementsComments on the study can be submitted to sgvtransitstudy@sgvcog.org or 888-574-8264

Streetsblog’s coverage in the San Gabriel Valley is supported by Foothill Transit, providing car-free travel throughout the San Gabriel Valley with connections to new Gold Line stations across the Foothills and Commuter Express lines going to the heart from downtown LA To plan your trip, visit Foothill Transit. “Foothill Transit. Go to good places.

Subscribe to our SGV Connect newslettercoming to your inbox on Friday!

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Mayoral candidate Khalil Ramal pledges to provide full bus transit service in London, Ontario. – London https://supporttransit.org/mayoral-candidate-khalil-ramal-pledges-to-provide-full-bus-transit-service-in-london-ontario-london/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 19:46:58 +0000 https://supporttransit.org/mayoral-candidate-khalil-ramal-pledges-to-provide-full-bus-transit-service-in-london-ontario-london/ Mayoral candidate Khalil Ramal promises to provide London, Ont., with a comprehensive bus rapid transit plan if he is chosen for the city council’s lead role in the next municipal election. The former MP for London-Fanshawe unveiled his platform on Tuesday morning in front of dozens of supporters inside the Best Western Plus Lamplighter Inn […]]]>

Mayoral candidate Khalil Ramal promises to provide London, Ont., with a comprehensive bus rapid transit plan if he is chosen for the city council’s lead role in the next municipal election.

The former MP for London-Fanshawe unveiled his platform on Tuesday morning in front of dozens of supporters inside the Best Western Plus Lamplighter Inn and Conference Center in south London.

Read more:

Former Liberal MP Khalil Ramal enters London, Ontario. mayoral race

Other promises include free public transit for seniors 65 and older, a program to protect renters from negligent landlords and hundreds of new affordable homes in Ramal’s first month in office.

An online version of the platform is available on Ramal’s campaign website.

Homelessness, affordable housing, safety, employment, environment and transportation are the central pillars of Ramal’s platform.

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Roaming

On the homelessness front, Ramal seeks to present ideas first presented by local advocacy group The Forgotten 519, which made headlines when one of its members went on strike. hunger to call on the city to respond to the group’s demands.

These ideas include two “homelessness centres”, one in the east and one in the city centre, to provide round-the-clock support, as well as to stop the removal of camps, tents, campsites or squats in parks along the Thames. Valley Parkway, and in empty city lots.

Read more:

Hunger strike ends after City of London and ‘The Forgotten 519’ reach deal to help homeless people

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Ramal also wants to partner with frontline agencies to address issues of poverty and dependency in the city and expand London Food Bank’s greenhouse program to provide fresh, healthy food to those in need. need.

affordable housing

Ramal wants to see 6,000 new affordable units over the next four years and has set an ambitious goal of creating “hundreds of truly affordable new homes” in his first month in office.

“I’ve been working on this for over a year and a half,” Ramal told reporters when asked how he plans to get these houses built, adding that he was working with consultancy firm Devonshire Financial to draw up a proposal.

Another pledge includes a localized version of the RentSafeTO scheme “to protect London tenants from absent and negligent landlords”.

The Toronto version of the program includes building appraisals at least once every three years, a telephone system to track and respond to tenant service requests, and registration fees to be paid by landlords.

The idea was rejected by current councilors in July, but local tenant advocacy group London ACORN wants the next council to reconsider.

“Someone last week mentioned building 50,000 units, 10,000 in the center and 40,000 outside – where are the 40,000? In farmland? Ramal added a reference to the unveiling of his competitor Josh Morgan’s platform.

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“I am interested in stepping up downtown construction, revitalizing downtown and building community.

Security

Much of the focus on security is tied to increased resources for the London Police Service.

This includes hiring “50 new frontline staff to work directly with police to respond to homelessness and substance abuse emergencies.”

Read more:

London Chamber of Commerce releases 2022 Municipal Election Platform

Ramal also wants to increase police foot patrols in the city center by 75% and task the London Abused Women’s Center and ANOVA with training officers on how to work with ‘women who have been physically or sexually assaulted “.


Click to play the video:







Statistics show rise in police-reported violent crime


Statistics show rise in police-reported violent crime – August 2, 2022

Increased capacity is also being sought for organizations such as the local branch of the Canadian Mental Health Association and Ark Aid Street Mission.

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Works

Ramal told reporters that many of his ideas would lead to better retention of current London workers, while attracting new workers.

“Direct and accessible incentives” are promised to small businesses and Ramal wants to create a “Small Business Development Office” to provide grants and incentives to small businesses “that are committed to providing a living wage”.

Transportation

Ramal is seeking to complete the previously scrapped northern and western sections of London’s Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) scheme, which is currently only due to serve city centre, east London and south London.

BRT presented one of the most contentious issues for the city council in recent memory. Construction of the multi-year project began in 2021.

“If we’re talking about bringing more students to London, if we’re thinking about creating more jobs, we have to think about efficient public transit,” Ramal said.

Read more:

Londoner calls on London Transit Commission to allow pets on buses

Ramal wants to offer people aged 65 and over free public transport and continue Mayor Ed Holder’s call to fully electrify London Transit’s fleet.

A ‘safe and efficient city-wide walking and cycling system’ is promised, along with more protected cycle lanes across London.

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Environment

The latest element of Ramal’s platform promises a fully implemented green bin scheme in the first two years of London council’s next term, as well as finding a way to stop sewage from draining away. be discharged into the River Thames.

Ramal is also looking to work with city officials, ReForest London and senior governments to “restore our urban forests to a 40% canopy”.

Read more:

Mayoral candidate Josh Morgan promises 50,000 new homes for London, Ontario.

London’s next mayor will have just one vote on the city council, meaning Ramal’s pledges will require a majority of his colleagues on board, which he is confident he can deliver.

“I’m a good salesman, I’ve spent my whole life selling my ideas and convincing people to work with me,” Ramal said.

As for how he will pay for his ideas, Ramal says there will be “no tax increases”, adding that he will instead seek private donors, private partnerships and senior government funding.

“I will work day and night to find the money for these projects. I already have commitments from many philanthropists to fund some of these projects,” Ramal said.

“Londonians are generous people…they will donate if they see change and a better future for everyone in our city.”

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Ramal’s competitors in the race to become London’s next mayor include Brandon Ellis, Daniel Jeffery, Dan Lenart, Norman Robert Miles, Josh Morgan, Carlos Murray, Joanne Nichols, Sean O’Connell and Sandie Thomas.

Municipal elections in the city are scheduled for October 24.


Click to play the video: “Social media is becoming more and more present during municipal elections”







Social networks multiply in municipal elections


Social networks multiply in municipal elections

© 2022 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Local Leaders to Proceed with Southern Maryland Rapid Transit Project After Securing Federal Funding – Greater Washington https://supporttransit.org/local-leaders-to-proceed-with-southern-maryland-rapid-transit-project-after-securing-federal-funding-greater-washington/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 14:18:01 +0000 https://supporttransit.org/local-leaders-to-proceed-with-southern-maryland-rapid-transit-project-after-securing-federal-funding-greater-washington/ Escalators in the Branch Avenue subway station, a potential terminus for the proposed rapid transit project in southern Maryland. by Matt Johnson under a Creative Commons license. Momentum Gains on Southern Maryland Rapid Transit Project After Maryland’s congressional delegation secures $5 million appropriation to match state commitments to Southern Maryland’s rapid transit project, local leaders […]]]>

Escalators in the Branch Avenue subway station, a potential terminus for the proposed rapid transit project in southern Maryland. by Matt Johnson under a Creative Commons license.

Any advice for the links? Submit it here.

Matt Gontarchick is a government affairs and business development professional passionate about all things DC. A proud alumnus of the University of Maryland, Matt currently resides in Mount Pleasant. Although he’s a tireless advocate for smart growth and public transit, Matt can still be seen on weekends cruising around in his cute 2007 Toyota Camry.

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Route unveiled for $148 million north-south bus rapid transit service in Milwaukee County https://supporttransit.org/route-unveiled-for-148-million-north-south-bus-rapid-transit-service-in-milwaukee-county/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 19:34:13 +0000 https://supporttransit.org/route-unveiled-for-148-million-north-south-bus-rapid-transit-service-in-milwaukee-county/ Rendering of a BRT station, courtesy of Milwaukee County Transit Service. Last update on September 16, 2022 at 5:00 p.m. Milwaukee County East-west bus rapid transit (BRT) hasn’t officially started yet, but county officials are moving forward with plans for a possible second bus line. The county, with the Southeast Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission, are […]]]>
Rendering of a BRT station, courtesy of Milwaukee County Transit Service.

Last update on September 16, 2022 at 5:00 p.m.

Milwaukee County East-west bus rapid transit (BRT) hasn’t officially started yet, but county officials are moving forward with plans for a possible second bus line.

The county, with the Southeast Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission, are in the process of finalizing a feasibility study which recommends a north-south route along and near the 27e Street, between Bayshore in Glendale and the Northwestern Mutual campus in Franklin.

“The recommendation is the result of a series of analysis and public comments that considered various transit types and route options,” according to a press release from the Southwest Regional Planning Commission. east of Wisconsin.

27e Street route would provide access to an additional 116,000 people. The recommended route is expected to cost around $148 million. 80% of the cost of the project would be funded by the federal government. The route is expected to be open to the public by 2027 or 2028.

The proposed north-south BRT route along 27th Street.

It is recommended that the route be made up of nearly 80% of lanes dedicated to public transport. It would be about 15 minutes faster than the Milwaukee County Transit System‘s PurpleLine, with extended hours of service and buses every 10 minutes or less. The stations would be located 1/4 to 1/2 mile apart. The BRT service would replace the existing PurpleLine, but a traditional MCTS bus line would still serve many of the existing stops and connect to the BRT service.

According to the press release, initial ridership estimates show that BRT service along this north-south route could increase ridership by 45-60% over existing ridership on the PurpleLine.

BRT provides faster and more frequent service to passengers through the use of battery electric buses, dedicated lanes, elevated platforms at optimized stop locations, prioritization of traffic lights, outboard fares and other features.

County officials believe the dedicated lanes could also help curb reckless driving by introducing additional safety measures for pedestrians, narrowing traffic lanes and delineating transit lanes. The study also recommends 6.7 miles of new dedicated bike lanes along the route. Residents can give their opinion on the proposed new route on line.

The initial East-West BRT project – a nine-mile regional bus service to connect downtown Milwaukee, the Near West Side, Marquette University, Wauwatosa and the Milwaukee Regional Medical Center, is set to open in 2023. Official project of 55 million dollars received funding in December 2020.

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Northern Virginia Transportation Authority Proposes Regionwide Rapid Transit System – Greater Washington https://supporttransit.org/northern-virginia-transportation-authority-proposes-regionwide-rapid-transit-system-greater-washington/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 15:00:44 +0000 https://supporttransit.org/northern-virginia-transportation-authority-proposes-regionwide-rapid-transit-system-greater-washington/ Map of the rapid bus network proposed by NVTA’s TransAction proposal. Image by author using data from NVTA’s TransAction plan. The authority that governs regional transportation for Northern Virginia has released a proposal that includes 370 miles of high-capacity public transit across the region. This network would transform Greater Washington: it would make everyday travel […]]]>

Map of the rapid bus network proposed by NVTA’s TransAction proposal. Image by author using data from NVTA’s TransAction plan.

The authority that governs regional transportation for Northern Virginia has released a proposal that includes 370 miles of high-capacity public transit across the region. This network would transform Greater Washington: it would make everyday travel more sustainable, fairer, safer and more economically productive for much of Northern Virginia.

Yet the same document also includes plans for a thousand new miles of new and widened motorway lanes, an investment incompatible not only with the rapid transit system but also with the stated values ​​of the planning authority.

Here’s an overview of the plan and what we know so far.

In drawing this map, I have assumed that the “high capacity transit” not specified in the TransAction plan will be the BRT; I combined some lines, extended some to DC, and suggested names based on geography; I omitted some lines, especially on Langston Blvd and Glebe Road in Arlington, as these roads are too narrow to accommodate the full BRT.

A bold but contradictory plan

The Northern Virginia Transportation Authority (NVTA) is responsible for setting transportation policies and priorities throughout the region. He recently released a draft of his main long-term plan, Transaction, for public comment. Transaction is “non-fiscally constrained,” meaning it may contain more projects than NVTA will be able to fund.

This project includes the most ambitious transportation plan currently proposed in Greater Washington. NVTA proposes to invest up to $45 billion over the next 25 years in a rapid transit network, most likely bus rapid transit: BRT uses extra-wide buses on physically separated to provide the same quality of service as the metro for a small fraction of the cost.

This proposal, if not diluted in an “enhanced bus” service without dedicated lanes, would transform our region. It would complement Metro and VRE, connecting the Leesburg area to Woodbridge so most residents wouldn’t need a car. We could concentrate growth around new rapid transit lines, providing enough new housing to ease the housing crisis while easing pressure on exurban sprawl.

Transaction has bold goals, but it’s a plan that contradicts itself. In addition to BRT, it is allocating up to $29 billion for more than 1,000 new miles of highways that will take people away from public transport. These widenings, interchanges and bypasses will encourage Virginians to travel approximately 6 billion additional miles each year, emitting at least twenty and up to eighty million metric tons of greenhouse gases equivalent to carbon dioxide by 2030. This would be new traffic, not just reroutes. On the high end, these are the same emissions as operating a new coal-fired power plant at full capacity. The car is the most dangerous motorized means of getting around cities and the most economically exclusive. That $29 billion goes against NVTA’s “core values ​​of fairness, sustainability, and safety.” We are no longer building new coal-fired plants. Why are we building new highways?

I’m not jealous of NVTA President Phyllis Randall. She is chair of the board of not only NVTA, but also Loudoun County, and when we spoke, she explained the connection the Authority is in. Randall, like his colleagues on both councils, is dedicated to fairness, sustainability and safety. Randall pointed out that Loudoun County has not approved any new development west of Rt. 15 in more than a decade, protecting Northern Virginia’s natural environment.

NVTA’s mandate, Randall explained, is to improve transportation for everyone in Northern Virginia, not just people living in transit-friendly areas like Arlington. The NVTA is looking at ways to help residents of the outer suburbs get around car-free, but so far they haven’t been able to come up with an approach that doesn’t involve more freeways, Randall said. .

I know it’s hard to imagine a solution for such remote and car-dependent areas, but I hope it won’t be impossible.

Pie chart by number of projects, not by amount of funding. Note: Acronyms: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV), High Occupancy Toll (HOT), and Transportation Demand Management (TDM). Image of the draft TransAction plan.

We need transportation that puts people first

The contradiction of Transaction is rooted in mode-based rather than person-based goals. People will use the infrastructure given to them: if it is faster and cheaper for me to drive to work, no matter how much I care about the environment; the boss needs me at nine, so I’ll jump in the car.

But if it’s easier to walk to a BRT route that goes past traffic, anyone will get on the bus. NVTA’s goals are to improve “mobility, accessibility and resilience across all modes, including roads, public transport, walking, cycling and more”. (TransAction p.4) If we drop this idea that all modes need to be improved, and instead start looking for the most efficient way to help people get around, we can build a Virginia where our investments work together instead to cancel each other out.

The public comment period will be open until September 18. You can learn more about Transactionsubmit your comment (English| Spanish| Korean), leave a voicemail (571-354-0065) or contact Randall directly.

D. Taylor Reich (they/them) is a native of Arlington and a graduate of HB Woodlawn. They are researchers and study urban mobility analysis with the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (itdp.org), but their writing for GGWash is entirely their own.

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Gorham-Westbrook-Portland Rapid Transit Public Meeting Scheduled https://supporttransit.org/gorham-westbrook-portland-rapid-transit-public-meeting-scheduled/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 23:26:38 +0000 https://supporttransit.org/gorham-westbrook-portland-rapid-transit-public-meeting-scheduled/ Regional planners will hold a public meeting on September 22 to hear from community members on how best to provide rapid public transit service between Portland, Westbrook and Gorham. The purpose, needs, objectives, study area, and results of the project so far will be discussed at the open house-style meeting from 5:30-7:30 p.m. in the […]]]>

Regional planners will hold a public meeting on September 22 to hear from community members on how best to provide rapid public transit service between Portland, Westbrook and Gorham.

The purpose, needs, objectives, study area, and results of the project so far will be discussed at the open house-style meeting from 5:30-7:30 p.m. in the atrium of the Wishcamper Center at Southern University from Maine to Portland, according to the Greater Portland Council of Governments.

A virtual public meeting will take place the following week on September 28 from 6 to 7 p.m. via Zoom. Register on the project website, RapidTransitForME.org.

Planners from the Greater Portland Council of Governments are also asking the public to complete an online survey, available in six languages, also available on the project’s website. Additionally, the regional planning agency will host several in-person contextual events in Gorham, Westbrook and Portland the week of September 19.

“We want to know how a rapid transit line could benefit them, where they would like it to go, and what their hopes and concerns are for such a project,” said Ericka Amador, regional transportation planner at GPCOG. in a press release. .

Planners are considering the benefits and expected impacts of different rapid transit options as well as current bus service.

There is currently no funding to establish rapid transit service, but the study will allow transit agencies to apply for federal funding. Planners will complete the study next year, according to the GPCOG.

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🌱 Budget Boulder 2023 + Bus Rapid Transit On 287 + Hill Crime Spree https://supporttransit.org/%f0%9f%8c%b1-budget-boulder-2023-bus-rapid-transit-on-287-hill-crime-spree/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 11:47:26 +0000 https://supporttransit.org/%f0%9f%8c%b1-budget-boulder-2023-bus-rapid-transit-on-287-hill-crime-spree/ Hey, Rock! I’m back with your new copy of the Boulder Daily. Come and discover the most important things happening around the city. 📣 Our readers love to celebrate good news! You can now shout your big announcement at the top of the Boulder Daily newsletter. Whether it’s a grand opening, new product for sale, […]]]>

Hey, Rock! I’m back with your new copy of the Boulder Daily. Come and discover the most important things happening around the city.


📣 Our readers love to celebrate good news! You can now shout your big announcement at the top of the Boulder Daily newsletter. Whether it’s a grand opening, new product for sale, birthday, anniversary, engagement, wedding or new baby, let everyone celebrate at your side! Submit your ad here.


Saturday’s weather: Rather cloudy, showers around. High: 58 Low: 45.


🏡 Looking for more Boulder real estate leads? Let us help you reach potential buyers and set you apart from the competition. Click here to find out more.


Here are the best stories in Boulder today:

  • modern alpine, a cafe that sells drinks, small bites and merchandise has opened a new location on 29th Street. (303)
  • Boulder County Public Health has received reports businesses going door-to-door in areas affected by the Marshall Fire offering testing and cleaning to people who may not need their services. (BOCO)
  • The Boulder County Bike Map is now available. The updated version of the Boulder County bicycle map was released Thursday by the county’s transportation division. (Daily CO)

You’re all caught up for today. I’ll be in your inbox tomorrow morning with another update! — Brad K. Evans

Do you have a topical tip or a suggestion for an upcoming Boulder Daily? Contact me at Boulderdaily@yahoo.com

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Boulder County and Broomfield Release US 287 Bus Rapid Transit Feasibility Study https://supporttransit.org/boulder-county-and-broomfield-release-us-287-bus-rapid-transit-feasibility-study/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 01:23:36 +0000 https://supporttransit.org/boulder-county-and-broomfield-release-us-287-bus-rapid-transit-feasibility-study/ After 18 months of work, Boulder County and its partners have released a feasibility study providing recommendations for improved transit-related services and other investments along US 287 from Longmont to New York. US 36 to Broomfield. With a view to responding to growing congestion and increasing travel demand, the study proposes a variety of improvements […]]]>

After 18 months of work, Boulder County and its partners have released a feasibility study providing recommendations for improved transit-related services and other investments along US 287 from Longmont to New York. US 36 to Broomfield.

With a view to responding to growing congestion and increasing travel demand, the study proposes a variety of improvements to help implement bus rapid transit, or a high-quality transit system based on buses which is more reliable, convenient and faster than traditional bus service.

“We’re really trying to create a better corridor for people to travel — however they want to,” said Boulder County Multimodal Transportation Planner Jeff Butts. “It’s really that backbone…that connects Boulder County.”

The feasibility study was conducted amid the coronavirus pandemic, which has led to changes in traditional travel behaviors. The project team took this into consideration and made sure to differentiate between pre-COVID-19 transit and travel data and post-COVID projections, the study notes.

The study, which was released for review earlier this week, generally examines multiple scenarios, including maintaining existing conditions, achieving baseline operational improvements, and achieving operational improvements while adding stations, intersections and bus and turn lanes.

It also identifies high priority intersections including US 287 and Isabelle Road and US 287 and Baseline Road in Lafayette and US 287 and Midway Boulevard in Broomfield. In general, these are areas that have been identified as high priority, given that these are the intersections where transit is experiencing the longest levels of delays, Butts noted.

It offers a variety of upgrades for everyone, such as intersection upgrades and signal and queue jumps – or a space where the bus can stay to the right of traffic when it starts to move, allowing thus the bus to “skip the queue” at the front of the line.

Through a variety of community conversations conducted throughout the process, there were a number of key takeaways.

Community members said there needs to be a safe place for bikes and a safer way to cross US 287. They also said they would like gated stations and protection from the elements and that important to be able to predict when the bus will arrive.

The study identifies a variety of proposals along the 20-mile corridor with a planning level cost estimate ranging from $167 million to $215 million.

At a public meeting last December, Deputy Director of Transportation Planning Kathleen Bracke noted that Boulder County could use federal infrastructure funds to help defray some of the costs.

Still, this is a feasibility study, and it will be some time before projects begin.

“We recognize that we’ll probably have to do it one step at a time, but that’s really how all of our corridors come together,” Bracke said.

The study itself was co-funded by Boulder County and the City and County of Broomfield, although the corridor itself also involves other municipalities including Longmont, Erie and Lafayette.

This will ultimately lead to a variety of projects planned and paid for by different jurisdictions, Butts noted.

“Again, we will work with partners across the region to implement this, and there will be congruent projects underway at the same time,” he said.

“We’re looking to have concurrent projects (and) at the same time be opportunistic with them,” Butts said, adding that the county and its various partners would be looking for projects that meet multiple objectives.

Now that the initial phase is complete, the county is moving into a second, safety-focused phase. It wasn’t originally part of the plan, but was inspired by community feedback, Butts noted.

“How can we prevent a tragic loss of life or… a life-altering accident? We take this very seriously… and we are working hard on it,” he said.

Comments on the US 287 Bus Rapid Transit feasibility study are ongoing through September 16. They can be donated online at boco.org/287planning. To stay informed about the work, sign up for news at boco.org/US287news.

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