Rapid transit – Support Transit http://supporttransit.org/ Mon, 16 May 2022 14:13:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://supporttransit.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-8-120x120.png Rapid transit – Support Transit http://supporttransit.org/ 32 32 Mozambique: Relaunch of the bus rapid transit system for Maputo https://supporttransit.org/mozambique-relaunch-of-the-bus-rapid-transit-system-for-maputo/ Mon, 16 May 2022 14:13:52 +0000 https://supporttransit.org/mozambique-relaunch-of-the-bus-rapid-transit-system-for-maputo/ Maputo — Maputo transport authorities have re-launched plans to establish a Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system, which should greatly improve conditions for bus passengers in the Mozambican capital. According to an article in Monday’s edition of the independent daily “O Pais”, citing the Maputo Metropolitan Transport Agency, work on the BRT could start in 2023, […]]]>

Maputo — Maputo transport authorities have re-launched plans to establish a Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system, which should greatly improve conditions for bus passengers in the Mozambican capital.

According to an article in Monday’s edition of the independent daily “O Pais”, citing the Maputo Metropolitan Transport Agency, work on the BRT could start in 2023, and the project could be operational in 2024.

A BRT system consists of establishing bus lanes that cannot be used by any other traffic. The idea was first proposed in 2014, when drawing up a viability study and presenting the bus lines. 198 articulated buses, each capable of holding 160 passengers, will run along the routes.

There were to be four bus stations, 29 stations along the lines, a maintenance area and an electronic ticketing system.

The Brazilian government was to finance the project, which would be in the hands of the Brazilian engineering company Odebrecht. But Odebrecht was deeply involved in corruption, and in October 2016 the Brazilian government announced the suspension of $4.7 billion in funding for 25 public works projects in Africa and Latin America. The investigation revealed that Odebrecht paid bribes of $900,000 in Mozambique.

Odebrecht was suspected of having paid the money in connection with the construction of the international airport in the northern city of Nacala, an airport that has almost no flights and no passengers.

Without Brazilian funding, the BRT project languished, but it is now taken over by the Maputo Metropolitan Transport Agency, in collaboration with the municipalities of Maputo and Matola. This time, the proposed funding source is the World Bank, which the Transport Agency says is making a $250 million grant available.

The new BRT scheme is more ambitious than the 2014 project, as the routes are not limited to Maputo, but continue to Matola.

Metropolitan Transport Agency technical administrator Armando Bembele told ‘O Pais’ that at peak times the BRT should be able to move 10,000 passengers per hour.

“For everyone who lives in the area covered by BRT, the transportation problem will cease to exist,” Bembele said.

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The public is invited to view the design plans for the bus rapid transit system https://supporttransit.org/the-public-is-invited-to-view-the-design-plans-for-the-bus-rapid-transit-system/ Sat, 14 May 2022 01:17:17 +0000 https://supporttransit.org/the-public-is-invited-to-view-the-design-plans-for-the-bus-rapid-transit-system/ BATON ROUGE, La. (BRPROUD) – Members of the public are invited to review design plans for the bus rapid transit system at a series of upcoming meetings. The transit system aims to connect the north and side of Baton Rouge with downtown, according to city-parish officials. Features of the system would include frequent service, specially […]]]>

BATON ROUGE, La. (BRPROUD) – Members of the public are invited to review design plans for the bus rapid transit system at a series of upcoming meetings.

The transit system aims to connect the north and side of Baton Rouge with downtown, according to city-parish officials. Features of the system would include frequent service, specially designed stations, real-time timetable information displays at stations, level boarding at stations, improved station lighting, and more.

“We are building Louisiana’s first bus rapid transit service,” said Mayor-Chair Sharon Weston Broome. “These meetings will give the public the opportunity to learn about the amenities of a BRT system, the route, how it will work; and even give us suggestions for naming this exciting new service.

When and where will the meetings take place:

tuesday may 17

  • 5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
  • Carver Branch Library, Room 2
  • 720 terrace avenue

Wednesday May 18

  • 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • River Center Library Square
  • 250 North Blvd.

Wednesday May 18

  • 5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
  • Charles R. Kelly Community Center
  • 3535 Riley Street

In late 2021, Mayor Broome tested the nine-mile route along Plank Road, Florida Boulevard, and Nicholson Drive. According to Capital Area Transit System, they expect to generate $1.6 billion in economic impact for the city over the next 10 years.

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MARTA to Study Bus Rapid Transit on Premium I-285 Toll Lanes – SaportaReport https://supporttransit.org/marta-to-study-bus-rapid-transit-on-premium-i-285-toll-lanes-saportareport/ Thu, 12 May 2022 21:12:18 +0000 https://supporttransit.org/marta-to-study-bus-rapid-transit-on-premium-i-285-toll-lanes-saportareport/ By John Ruch The possibility of bus rapid transit (BRT) service on new I-285 premium toll lanes will be explored by MARTA following a multi-government agreement signed on May 11. The Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT) is planning to add twin “express lanes”—Peach Pass using toll lanes—to 285 between the I-20 east and west interchanges, […]]]>

By John Ruch

The possibility of bus rapid transit (BRT) service on new I-285 premium toll lanes will be explored by MARTA following a multi-government agreement signed on May 11.

The Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT) is planning to add twin “express lanes”—Peach Pass using toll lanes—to 285 between the I-20 east and west interchanges, as well as part of Ga. 400, over the next 15 years. In 2017, Brookhaven Mayor John Ernst began convening officials from various upscale towns to discuss the possibility of adding transit services on or alongside these routes. This effort culminated in the study, which will include these cities as members of an advisory group.

GDOT and MARTA already have a separate agreement for BRT to operate on Ga. 400 toll lanes north of 285, although this remains in the planning stage with many details unknown. BRT refers to buses running in a dedicated lane, usually with limited stops, to make them as fast as possible.

GDOT said its toll lane design does not include public transit, but would not preclude its addition. The agency also said it would allow transit vans and buses to use the lanes for free.

The agreement authorizing the study warns that “GDOT does not guarantee that the BRT will be built” and that the final decision on any transit element “rests solely with GDOT”. However, GDOT Commissioner Russell McMurry in a press release came out strongly in favor of the concept.

“Transit along the I-285 corridor has to be part of our solution,” McMurry said. “This significant and historic opportunity for our region is enabling this crucial mobility expansion and Georgia DOT is eager to be a part of the process.”

The study will include connections to existing Hamilton E. Holmes and Indian Creek MARTA stations, according to the transit agency.

While a multi-government memorandum of understanding outlining the deal was officially signed on May 11, the deal has been in the works for months. The memorandum of understanding is dated March 9, and a separate agreement between MARTA and the Atlanta-Region Transit Link Authority (The ATL) authorizing MARTA to conduct the study is dated February 7.

Signatories to the MOU include the ATL, MARTA, GDOT, the Atlanta Regional Commission, and Cobb, DeKalb, Fulton, and Gwinnett counties. Cobb and Gwinnett are contributing financially to the study. DeKalb and Fulton are and weren’t originally included as signatories for this reason, but were added later after applying to join, according to MARTA. Each signatory is guaranteed “access” to any transit service that may be built.

The approved process, according to the memorandum of understanding, includes vision, scope, planning and a concept study “with associated public engagement and communications.” Details will include “station design and transit vehicle movements, access points, and entry and exit ramps.”

The process will include two advisory ‘working groups’, one technical and the other political. The Policy Working Group will include elected representative from the governments of Atlanta, Brookhaven, Chamblee, Clarkston, Cobb, DeKalb, Doraville, Dunwoody, Fulton, Gwinnett, Sandy Springs, Smyrna, and Tucker; ATL’s Executive Director or designate; the commissioner or designate of the GDOT; and the Managing Director/CEO of MARTA or his representative.

MARTA will contribute up to $14,284,307 in funding. The ATL will provide various amounts of funding, including $1,158,205 from the US Federal Bailout (ARP) for the Xpress commuter bus service. Transit-related ARP money also comes from Cobb ($546,888) and Gwinnett ($213,645).

Any unspent money will revert to these sources on a proportional basis, according to the memorandum of understanding. If more money is needed, “good faith” discussions will follow on whether and how to obtain it.

GDOT has divided the high-end toll lanes into several separate projects with different phases for bidding purposes. Section 285 has three pieces, one of which confusingly includes a portion of Ga. 400. A request for proposals (RFP) for the 285/20 West interchange area is expected to come out later this year. The initial Section 285 East is slated for tender next year and Section 285 West in 2024. The separate Ga. 400 section is already in a tender phase, with selection of contractors expected l ‘next year.

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Will we see self-driving buses on the new Rapid Bus being built in Pittsburgh? – WPXI https://supporttransit.org/will-we-see-self-driving-buses-on-the-new-rapid-bus-being-built-in-pittsburgh-wpxi/ Tue, 10 May 2022 10:15:13 +0000 https://supporttransit.org/will-we-see-self-driving-buses-on-the-new-rapid-bus-being-built-in-pittsburgh-wpxi/ Will we see self-driving buses on the new Rapid Bus being built in Pittsburgh? PITTSBURGH — Work is underway right now on a plan to speed up travel between downtown and Oakland. Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) service enters at 5th and Forbes Avenues. There will be “bus only” lanes connecting the busy corridor. Related >>> […]]]>

Will we see self-driving buses on the new Rapid Bus being built in Pittsburgh?

PITTSBURGH — Work is underway right now on a plan to speed up travel between downtown and Oakland.

Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) service enters at 5th and Forbes Avenues. There will be “bus only” lanes connecting the busy corridor.

Related >>> City leaders approve nearly $13 million for Port Authority to connect Oakland to downtown Pittsburgh

Moments into an interview with Vincent Valdes, executive director of the Southwestern Pennsylvania Commission (the group that decides how to spend federal transit money, locally), Valdes broached the idea of ​​self-driving buses the along the BRT route. He thinks we could see them even sooner than self-driving cars on the road.

“It makes sense to do it in transit. It is a very targeted application. You work in professional fleets,” Valdes said.

He told Channel 11’s Jennifer Tomazic that he thinks we’ll see them in the next 10 years.

So she pitched this idea to the head of the Port Authority, whose buses will run on the Oakland to Downtown BRT.

Katharine Kelleman first highlighted several autonomous shuttle pilot programs underway across the country. She didn’t say “yes” or “no” to the idea of ​​Port Authority buses, but did tell Jennifer this:

“So as we look to an autonomous future, it would be great to be able to free up that driver to provide that higher level of customer service,” Kelleman said. “We plan to keep an operator on this vehicle for that touch of customer service.”

Kelleman said there are already many technologies they could put on buses to help with safety, even before self-driving buses hit the market.

Stan Caldwell does a lot of research on technology trends in automated vehicles with his Traffic 21 Institute initiative. He works at Carnegie Melon University and has invited Channel 11 to Navlab, where they have been researching this kind of technology since the 80s.

Although they’re not testing any automated buses here, CMU is investigating what automation would mean for public transit.

“The role of drivers will be high because they still have to take care of passenger duties, maintain the safety of passengers and everything around the vehicle, but they will also have to manage the technology,” Caldwell said.

This is one of the bus riders’ concerns when Jennifer asked them if they would take a self-driving bus.

“I’m not sure,” hesitated Devante Blair, who takes the bus to work in Oakland, “because I still have to get past the self-driving cars.”

“I don’t know about that. When (the bus) turns onto Murray from Forbes, it’s a bit difficult,” a CMU student pointed out. “I think a human should do that.”

Specifically, some of the flaws, according to Caldwell, are still being worked out.

“I wouldn’t be comfortable getting to the point where we have driverless buses operating on open streets with the technology that exists now,” Caldwell said. “I think we still need humans to handle these complex situations, but we should be using automation to make systems more efficient and safer.”

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Is bus rapid transit good for the North Shore? https://supporttransit.org/is-bus-rapid-transit-good-for-the-north-shore/ Mon, 09 May 2022 18:09:00 +0000 https://supporttransit.org/is-bus-rapid-transit-good-for-the-north-shore/ More than a quarter of residents say they need to know how the plan will affect roads before they can decide if they like it. TransLink says a new bus rapid transit system could get us around the region at a fraction of the cost of new SkyTrain lines, and get the job done in […]]]>

More than a quarter of residents say they need to know how the plan will affect roads before they can decide if they like it.

TransLink says a new bus rapid transit system could get us around the region at a fraction of the cost of new SkyTrain lines, and get the job done in a much faster time.

But what do traffic-weary North Shore residents and commuters think of a plan that could see some local roads redeveloped for bus rapid transit?

The North Shore News polled 1,153 readers and asked the question: What do you think of the bus rapid transit project to the North Shore?

The poll ran from April 28 to May 9, 2022. Of the 1,153 votes, we can determine that 544 are from the community. The full results are as follows:

It’s good. It can move a lot of people and we can do it quickly. 37.87% local, 38.86% overall

I have to see what the impact will be on the existing roads before deciding. 27.94% local, 26.19% overall

It’s bad. We should have SkyTrain, even if it costs us more and takes a decade. 34.19% local, 34.95% overall

Local Total

A study published in 2021 by North Shore Connects, which is made up of the three North Shore municipalities and two First Nations, found that a rapid transit line would take 50,000 vehicle trips per day from the two bridges. of the North Shore.

Public consultations on the plan ended in May. 4.

The findings are based on an online survey of North Shore News adult readers located in North Vancouver and West Vancouver. The margin of error – which measures the variability of the sample – is +/- 2.88%, 19 times out of 20.

North Shore News uses a variety of techniques to capture data, detect and prevent vote fraud, detect and prevent bots, and filter non-local and duplicate votes.

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San Francisco Bus Rapid Transit running well, one month later https://supporttransit.org/san-francisco-bus-rapid-transit-running-well-one-month-later/ Thu, 05 May 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://supporttransit.org/san-francisco-bus-rapid-transit-running-well-one-month-later/ The highly anticipated Van Ness Bus Rapid Transit project in San Francisco, which opened a month ago, is successfully reducing travel times and attracting 13% more passengers, reports Ricardo Cano. “Weekday trips north on the BRT lanes also save riders 35% in travel time, according to the agency, meaning it takes around nine minutes less […]]]>

The highly anticipated Van Ness Bus Rapid Transit project in San Francisco, which opened a month ago, is successfully reducing travel times and attracting 13% more passengers, reports Ricardo Cano. “Weekday trips north on the BRT lanes also save riders 35% in travel time, according to the agency, meaning it takes around nine minutes less for Muni buses to travel the corridor than ‘before the BRT project.

According to Cano, “Before the pandemic, it took 49 buses 50 minutes, round trip, to travel between stops at Mission and 13th Street and Van Ness and Chestnut Street. Now, buses on the same route do so in around 36 minutes on weekday mornings, cutting journey times by 14 minutes, according to agency data. Going forward, “BRT lanes are expected to save more travel time as the agency optimizes transit signal priority which helps buses move faster at corridor intersections. ”

Meanwhile, the agency is struggling to restore pre-pandemic service levels. “Frustrated transit advocates wanted SFMTA to move faster to restore suspended lines and add frequencies to current lines, though the agency said a shortage of operators had hampered progress.”

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Green light for Mississauga section of major bus rapid transit route https://supporttransit.org/green-light-for-mississauga-section-of-major-bus-rapid-transit-route/ Thu, 05 May 2022 16:20:26 +0000 https://supporttransit.org/green-light-for-mississauga-section-of-major-bus-rapid-transit-route/ By Declan Finucane Published on May 5, 2022 at 12:20 p.m. The Dundas Bus Rapid Transit project is still in the planning stage. When completed years from now, the 48-kilometre bus line will stretch from Hamilton to Mississauga and Toronto. (Photo: Metrolinx) Plans for the eastern part of Mississauga for a bus rapid transit (BRT) […]]]>

By Declan Finucane

Published on May 5, 2022 at 12:20 p.m.

The Dundas Bus Rapid Transit project is still in the planning stage. When completed years from now, the 48-kilometre bus line will stretch from Hamilton to Mississauga and Toronto. (Photo: Metrolinx)

Plans for the eastern part of Mississauga for a bus rapid transit (BRT) route that will stretch nearly 50 kilometers along Dundas Street have received the green light from the Ontario government.

In an update on the status of the massive Dundas BRT project, company officials said this week that the eastern Mississauga segment of the route has been given the green light by the provincial government.

When completed in a few years, the 48-kilometre express bus line will cut an east-west path from the Kipling Transit Hub in Toronto to the highway. 6 to Hamilton, via Mississauga and Halton.

It will stretch 17 kilometers through Mississauga, including the newly approved Mississauga East portion that stretches seven kilometers from Etobicoke Creek in the east to Confederation Parkway. in the West.

The project foresees that approximately 20 kilometers of the route will be a reserved bus lane or a reserved right-of-way, separated from other traffic.

Metrolinx, the provincial agency overseeing the Dundas BRT project and working with the City of Mississauga to complete it, released an Environmental Project Report (EPR) on the Mississauga East section of the line on Feb. 22.

It contained an assessment of the current location of this part of the project (Etobicoke Creek to Confederation Parkway) – and what it might look like when completed – after a long period of planning and public consultation.

From there, a distilled report was again sent to residents and the wider community for further comment before being reviewed for 35 days by the province, which then approved the plan.

Now planning is moving to the other three segments of the project, beginning with the Mississauga West (Confederation Pkwy. West to Ninth Line) and Toronto (Kipling Transit Hub to Etobicoke Creek) components.

The fourth segment includes Halton and Hamilton (Ninth Line West to Highway 6).

Metrolinx officials say the public sessions and feedback are crucial “because they often help shape the final product. Some of the concerns revealed during the community consultation regarding the Dundas BRT included the potential for reduced lane widths, how left turn and U-turn lanes could be changed, traffic congestion, safety of crosswalks and station platforms for pedestrians and drivers, and impacts on property. .”

Mississauga officials said earlier that the massive BRT project “will impact the look, feel and operation of Dundas St. in the future.”

Artist’s rendering shows what the Dundas BRT could look like once built. (Image: Metrolinx)

Metrolinx says the design will enable “faster and more reliable transit connections” throughout the region.

They said earlier that the Dundas BRT, first introduced to residents and businesses last April, will fill a significant transportation void in Mississauga and beyond.

“Currently, there is no seamless east-west transit service along Dundas Street, impacting connectivity and accessibility for residents, workers and residents. commuters,” Metrolinx officials said.

According to Metrolinx, the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area welcomes some 110,000 new residents each year and is expected to welcome more than 10 million people by 2041.

insauga editorial standards and policies

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San Francisco’s new bus rapid transit routes on Van Ness get rave reviews – CBS San Francisco https://supporttransit.org/san-franciscos-new-bus-rapid-transit-routes-on-van-ness-get-rave-reviews-cbs-san-francisco/ Wed, 04 May 2022 02:06:00 +0000 https://supporttransit.org/san-franciscos-new-bus-rapid-transit-routes-on-van-ness-get-rave-reviews-cbs-san-francisco/ SAN FRANCISCO (KPIX 5) – This is a project that took many years and caused a lot of headaches, but it seems to be working. San Francisco’s Van Ness Bus Rapid Transit project was approved in 2013 and finally started in May. Now many people are already calling it a success. “Buses, even though they […]]]>

SAN FRANCISCO (KPIX 5) – This is a project that took many years and caused a lot of headaches, but it seems to be working. San Francisco’s Van Ness Bus Rapid Transit project was approved in 2013 and finally started in May. Now many people are already calling it a success.

Buses, even though they have to stop for lights, don’t get stuck in traffic,” said Hellen, aboard 49 Geary Tuesday. “So they go up and down Van Ness smoothly. It’s much faster and the ride is smoother.

READ MORE: Legal experts warn Roe V. Wade that reversal could impact California women despite protections

Making her regular trip from Union Street to Mission, the Muni regular says the new lanes have made a huge difference.

“I would say up to 15 minutes, which is a lot,” Hellen said. “I did not expect that.”

“We’re getting about a 30 percent speed improvement in one direction, and about a 15 percent speed improvement in the other direction,” said SFMTA Transportation Manager Jeffrey Tumlin. “We are getting a dramatic improvement in reliability.”

According to the SFMTA, just about everyone, including drivers in their new designated lanes, finds the new arrangement an improvement. Muni’s runtimes are even better than expected and more tinkering will likely improve times further.

READ MORE: COVID: Infections rise in all nine Bay Area counties

“And that’s important, because if you’re trying to get your kids to school in the morning, like before, with all the traffic,” said Muni runner Juthaporn Chaloeicheep. “It was hazardous.”

As for the decade of construction, Muni says what was learned on Van Ness is already being used on other projects.

“So for us, one of the lessons is ‘go fast,'” Tumlin said. “Use our fast build techniques focusing on the surface. So I’m working on Geary, and on Taraval, and on 16th Street, I get almost the same benefit, about 20% speed boost, at about a tenth of the cost.

“Well, I live on Van Ness and the years they worked there were kind of nightmarish,” Hellen said of the build. “But I have to say yes, I really like the fastest ride.”

Better service brings more passengers. Muni says traffic along this corridor has increased about 15% since they rolled out the red carpet.

NO MORE NEWS: UPDATE: Leaked Supreme Court opinion quashing Roe V. Wade Sparks Bay Area protests

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Controversial North Hollywood-Pasadena Bus Rapid Transit Line Approved https://supporttransit.org/controversial-north-hollywood-pasadena-bus-rapid-transit-line-approved/ Mon, 02 May 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://supporttransit.org/controversial-north-hollywood-pasadena-bus-rapid-transit-line-approved/ “LA County Transit Officials have approved a bus route in a busy corridor connecting the San Fernando and San Gabriel Valleys,” reports Ryan Fonseca for LAist. The Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro) Board of Directors approved the final Environmental Impact Report (EIR) for the project on April 28, 2022. The North Hollywood to […]]]>

“LA County Transit Officials have approved a bus route in a busy corridor connecting the San Fernando and San Gabriel Valleys,” reports Ryan Fonseca for LAist. The Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro) Board of Directors approved the final Environmental Impact Report (EIR) for the project on April 28, 2022.

The North Hollywood to Pasadena Transit Corridor has been met with considerable controversy since its initial proposal in 2018. Metro released a draft EIR in fall 2020 before encountering an unexpected filibuster in spring 2021 from board member Kevin de León, who is now running for mayor. Some of the sharpest controversies created by the project centered on a planned alignment along Colorado Boulevard in the Eagle Rock neighborhood of Los Angeles. The final EIR includes the Colorado Boulevard alignment.

The final plan is to connect North Hollywood (a neighborhood in the San Fernando Valley in the city of Los Angeles) to Pasadena, also passing through several neighborhoods in Los Angeles in addition to the cities of Burbank and Glendale.

“The route will be approximately 19 miles with 22 stops, beginning at the Subway B/G (red/orange) line station in North Hollywood in the west and ending at Pasadena City College in the east. The BRT operates more like a ‘light rail on wheels’, with improved stations and prioritization at intersections,” says Fonseca.

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Route and Final Design for NoHo Bus Rapid Transit Project in Pasadena Approved by Metro Board https://supporttransit.org/route-and-final-design-for-noho-bus-rapid-transit-project-in-pasadena-approved-by-metro-board/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 23:30:22 +0000 https://supporttransit.org/route-and-final-design-for-noho-bus-rapid-transit-project-in-pasadena-approved-by-metro-board/ UPDATE, APRIL 29: Metro’s board of directors unanimously approved the route and final design at its April 28 meeting. Metro will continue to work with stakeholders and cities to resolve the issues raised. The original Source post with project details is below – it was first posted on April 13. *** The Original Source message: […]]]>

UPDATE, APRIL 29: Metro’s board of directors unanimously approved the route and final design at its April 28 meeting. Metro will continue to work with stakeholders and cities to resolve the issues raised. The original Source post with project details is below – it was first posted on April 13.

***

The Original Source message:

One of the missing links in our transit system has been a good connection between the San Fernando and San Gabriel Valleys, which serves key destinations and is easily accessible through neighborhoods.

There is good news on this front. The route and the final environmental study for a new 19-mile bus rapid transit route between North Hollywood and Pasadena will be considered by Metro’s board of directors this month (the project’s homepage is here). The project is officially known as the North Hollywood to Pasadena Bus Rapid Transit Corridor Project and is receiving $317 million in funding from Measure M – the 2016 LA County voter-approved sales tax – and of State Bill 1.

The approval of the route and the study are an important step towards the realization of the project. Once the board takes action, Metro can begin obtaining building permits from cities along the route and move the project into its final design phase. The goal is to open the project in 2024.

A map of the proposed route is above. The project includes approximately 11.3 miles of bus-only lanes and would run primarily on local streets between the B (red) line station in NoHo and Pasadena City College. Major stations are located in the Burbank Media District, Downtown Burbank, Downtown Glendale, the Eagle Rock Commercial Corridor along Colorado Boulevard, and Old Pasadena – where there is a line connection L (Gold).

Unlike Metro’s existing 501 bus that runs much of its route on Highway 134, this new line would run primarily through neighborhoods and be easier for riders to reach. With the project, travel times would decrease by 30 to 40% compared to the existing bus service in the corridor. For example, from downtown Glendale, it would only take 30 minutes to get to PCC, which is 18 minutes longer than current journeys.

To be clear: this is an ambitious project (see below for more on two segments in particular). Metro currently operates two bus rapid transit lines — that is, bus lines designed to be faster — but they both have their own right-of-way. Line G (Orange) in the San Fernando Valley runs on its own bus lane built on top of an old rail line, while Line J (Silver) between El Monte and San Pedro primarily uses ExpressLanes on freeways 10 and 110.

This project is our first bus rapid transit line that would primarily use local streets. That’s why Metro is working with cities and local residents to determine where dedicated bus lanes are appropriate and how to minimize impacts on traffic and parking.

The detailed map below shows the different segments of the route, while graphics explain the differences between the segments.

The graphs below show the difference between the different configurations.

Curbside bus lanes are adjacent to the curb, eliminating parking or limiting parking to times when the bus lane is not operational.

Side traffic lanes dedicate the right traffic lane to buses and are separated from the sidewalk by bike lanes, parking lanes or both, and may allow private vehicles to turn right from the curb lane at intersections to reduce conflicts with buses.

Central traffic bus lanes generally provide two lanes (one for each direction of travel) and may be separated from adjacent traffic by short raised curbs or carriageway markings.

In the median segments, the bus travels in reserved lanes next to a median (ie the left lane – the most in the direction of travel). Stations can be placed inside the platform (for buses with left side doors).

Mixed flow allows buses to move from one reserved lane configuration to another, or when traffic, operational or geometric constraints make a dedicated lane impractical.

In particular, there are two parts of the route that have generated the most public debate.

The first is a 1.3 mile segment along Olive Avenue in Burbank. In this segment, the road would be reconfigured. The number of general traffic lanes would be reduced from two to one in each direction to accommodate a side traffic lane. The top renders show what Olive looks like now and the bottom render after the project is built:

Other key points on this segment:

•Olive would not be expanded for the project.

• The existing 299 parking spaces will be retained on Olive between Buena Vista and Lake.

•Cars can use the bus lane to turn right and access the aisles and parking lane.

•The sidewalks will remain as they are.

•Traffic studies show that travel times on Olive for motorists would cause some automobile traffic to use other major arteries instead of Olive. However, the same studies show that very few cars would divert to neighborhood streets, as these streets do not save time.

Another segment that has been the subject of intense public debate is the segment on Colorado Boulevard via Eagle Rock between Eagle Rock Boulevard and Linda Rosa Avenue near the SR-134 slide ramps.

In this segment, the Colorado would be reduced from two to one lane of general traffic in each direction. The bus lanes would be next to the medians in the center of the road – and these medians would be preserved and expanded.

The top render shows what Colorado Boulevard looks like now and the bottom shows what it would look like with the one lane option:

A few key points about this segment:

•Approximately 198 of the 319 existing parking spaces on Colorado Boulevard would be preserved. The existing 763 spaces on the side streets would also be retained.

• Most left turn lanes at traffic lights would remain — and two additional traffic lights would be added for left turns at Eagle Vista Drive and Hermosa Avenue. Some left-turn lanes would be lengthened to accommodate more vehicles. Some left turns at small intersections would be eliminated for safety reasons.

•Metro’s Business Solutions Center would be used to assist small businesses in Eagle Rock during construction of the Project.

• Traffic analysis shows that there would be additional congestion at both ends of this segment — where the two general traffic lanes merge into a single lane. However, Metro studies also found that approximately 20% of traffic on Colorado would be diverted to Interstates 134 and/or 2, resulting in a reduction in the total number of vehicles on Colorado.

•Studies have also shown that few vehicles would be diverted onto neighborhood streets. The reason: These streets are slower and less direct than staying on the Colorado, even with the reduced traffic lanes.

•Emergency vehicles would be allowed to use bus lanes, which could lead to faster response times.

The article will be heard at the Planning and Programming Committee meeting on Wednesday, April 20 starting at 10:30 a.m. — listen/watch the live stream here. JThe Metro’s full board is scheduled to hear this article on Thursday, April 28, starting at 10:00 a.m. – listen/watch here.

Here are some other renderings of the project:

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