Public transit funding – Support Transit http://supporttransit.org/ Sun, 01 May 2022 08:11:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://supporttransit.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-8-120x120.png Public transit funding – Support Transit http://supporttransit.org/ 32 32 Consultants work to secure funding for several Williamsport projects | News, Sports, Jobs https://supporttransit.org/consultants-work-to-secure-funding-for-several-williamsport-projects-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 04:36:42 +0000 https://supporttransit.org/consultants-work-to-secure-funding-for-several-williamsport-projects-news-sports-jobs/ Economic development consultants work for Williamsport on flood protection, public safety and other life improvements, trying to find Congressional-directed spending that is earmarked and other sources of funding for major projects . Keller Partners of Washington, DC this week presented a quarterly report to the Williamsport City Council and administration on […]]]>




Economic development consultants work for Williamsport on flood protection, public safety and other life improvements, trying to find Congressional-directed spending that is earmarked and other sources of funding for major projects .

Keller Partners of Washington, DC this week presented a quarterly report to the Williamsport City Council and administration on the progress of their business.

The official business of council was to vote to pass a resolution authorizing the first renewal of the consulting agreement between the city and the company.

Updates

It has been announced that the mayor will travel to Washington, DC on May 10 to meet with a congressional delegation. The goal, according to company director Thomas Keller, is to explore competitive grants and continue to build on relationships forged with federal officials on projects such as rehabilitation, certification and accreditation of dykes.

The levee protects up to $5 billion in real estate within the Greater Williamsport Flood Protection Area.

Along with U.S. Senator Bob Casey, D-Scranton, the federal redistricting of Pennsylvania had made the city represented in Congress by U.S. Representatives Dan Meuser and Glenn Thompson.

“It is very important to have the mayor as the representative of the city in front of these key federal decision makers,” Keller said.

A risk assessment of the levee by the Army Corps of Engineers to further identify weaknesses is estimated at $500,000 with a cost of half the game as part of the risk assessment. The work could take six to eight months.

Plans are in place to resubmit a $550,000 grant through the US Department of Justice.

This is a competitive grant under the “Connect and Protect” program, a law enforcement and behavioral health program.

The concept is to train law enforcement to work across jurisdictions with behavioral health professionals to improve outcomes with people with co-occurring mental illness and addiction.

When these people come into contact with the justice system, the goal is to improve the way law enforcement is able to handle this case and to try to reduce the number of people who go to jail.

Initially, Casey included the funding request for the police in an appropriations bill that did not make it a final bill and no municipality received the funding, according to Slaughter. “We have made some adjustments which we hope will position us for the resubmission of the grant application,” he said.

Keller Partners submits another Congressional-led spending request for the Senate and House for the seawall and for streetscape and beautification of the Newberry section along Arch Street from Abraham Howard Bridge to Ave. Dewey

“From the discussions, we are very positive about the direction of these requests,” Keller said.

The firm has identified grants from Homeland Security, Justice and Transportation. As these grants are rolled out, the company will have an eye on those related to the city’s funding needs.

Included are possible funds resulting from the bipartisan infrastructure law.

Keller thanked the city administration and named Slaughter and Jon Sander, city engineer, for continuing to identify the city’s needs.

Board Questions

Councilman Randall J. Allison said he heard there might be pre-mitigation grants available from the state Emergency Management Agency and was told he was right.

Allison also asked what impact the redistricting map had on the city. He was told that every decade a redistricting is done and that resulted in the removal of US Representative Fred Keller’s seat. Keller ultimately decided he didn’t want to run against another Republican. Williamsport can benefit from having two congressmen representing voters along with Thompson and Meuser.

Keller said the company is working on those relationships when it comes to allocating project funding.

Councilman Jon Mackey said that in terms of levee, a frequently used statistic applies: “For every dollar spent on mitigation, you save $6-8 in recovery costs.”

Mackey also urged the partners to vigorously pursue the Justice grant because he believed such crisis intervention for police was extremely important.

He asked why the initial grant application had not taken place. He was told officials wanted to ensure the city had more resources to oversee grant administration other than police administration.

Additionally, the grant administrators want to see a dedicated behavioral health specialist to be part of a crisis intervention team.

Councilman Eric Beiter questioned why the corps’ risk assessment of the levee was necessary since there have already been engineering studies done to identify weaknesses such as cross pipes that don’t drain. incorrectly and an I-shaped wall, etc. (not be high or strong enough to withstand a major flood).

The risk assessment should take place while the city and county work on the gaps already identified.

The Corps conducts an annual inspection and a more in-depth inspection of the dyke every five years. Keller Partners argued for a successful $5.6 million grant for portions of the levee on Lycoming Creek from the US Economic Development Administration in a previous administration.

Keller Partners worked with the Williamsport Municipal Water and Sanitary Authority on the replacement of its water and sanitary distribution and disposal systems and two fresh water tanks.

The company was not specifically asked to help end transit for the city, but would be willing to explore any potential transit-related funding sources.



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Advocates push for public funding of sidewalks in Denver https://supporttransit.org/advocates-push-for-public-funding-of-sidewalks-in-denver/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 02:06:00 +0000 https://supporttransit.org/advocates-push-for-public-funding-of-sidewalks-in-denver/ DENVER — Nearly half of Denver’s sidewalks are missing or too narrow, according to city documents, not counting those that are broken or damaged. This is why the Denver Streets Partnership started on “Denver deserves sidewalks” campaign. The group says they’re done waiting on the town. They are now turning directly to voters, asking them […]]]>


DENVER — Nearly half of Denver’s sidewalks are missing or too narrow, according to city documents, not counting those that are broken or damaged. This is why the Denver Streets Partnership started on “Denver deserves sidewalks” campaign.

The group says they’re done waiting on the town. They are now turning directly to voters, asking them to approve a new tax on the November ballot that would pay for a faster overhaul of Denver’s walkways.

Currently, individual homeowners and businesses in Denver are responsible for the sides adjacent to their properties, which has resulted in wide disparities in their upkeep. Below the new proposal, the burden of liability would shift to the city, funded by a recurring fee for landowners based on factors such as the length of the property and the type of street it is on. The Denver Streets Partnership says a typical single-family home could expect to pay annual fees of around $107, or about $9 per month.

Proponents argue that better pedestrian infrastructure is especially important for people with disabilities. Nica Cave, who uses a wheelchair, has lived in Denver on and off her entire life and told Denver7 this issue is particularly personal to her.

“I’ve been disabled my whole life,” Cave said. “It’s my lived experience using sidewalks as my primary route to get where I need to go.”

According to the City of Denver, 40% of sidewalks are missing or too narrow citywide. The number is even higher in low-income areas at 47%.

“You see a lot more unmaintained sidewalks, missing sidewalks. Especially around transit stops, which I depend on, and many people with disabilities also rely on public transit,” Cave said.

At current funding levels, according to the city of Denver, it would take about 400 years to build, widen and repair the sidewalks. “Denver deserves sidewalks” supporters are pushing for the project to be completed in nine years, made possible by increased public funding.

“I’ve been working on this issue for seven years and I’ve spoken to so many people who believe sidewalks are the foundation of a complete transportation system,” said Jill Locantore, executive director of the Denver Streets Partnership. “We should publicly fund sidewalks just as we publicly fund streets. This is how we will create a fairer, more equitable and safer community for everyone.

Advocates have received permission and documents from the city to begin collecting signatures on their petition. They will need nearly 10,000 by July 5 to get the question on the November ballot.



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EDC awaits formation of TIRZ while moving forward with Cultural Trust funding proposals https://supporttransit.org/edc-awaits-formation-of-tirz-while-moving-forward-with-cultural-trust-funding-proposals/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 05:05:20 +0000 https://supporttransit.org/edc-awaits-formation-of-tirz-while-moving-forward-with-cultural-trust-funding-proposals/ Photo by John Flynn Wednesday, April 27, 2022 by Chad Swiatecki The city’s economic development corporation is moving forward with evaluating proposals from creative groups vying for a portion of the $16.9 million cultural trust fund for creative spaces, but its role in managing the development south of Lady Bird Lake is in limbo as […]]]>


Photo by John Flynn

Wednesday, April 27, 2022 by Chad Swiatecki

The city’s economic development corporation is moving forward with evaluating proposals from creative groups vying for a portion of the $16.9 million cultural trust fund for creative spaces, but its role in managing the development south of Lady Bird Lake is in limbo as the real estate market moves forward.

Staff at EDC, a nonprofit, quasi-governmental agency created last year to pursue development around goals of affordability and job creation, are currently evaluating the cultural trust’s 45 funding proposals. A May 19 meeting with the candidates will brief them on the process that has been created in part to determine the long-term needs for safeguarding and creating creative spaces in the city as real estate prices continue to drive further development. artists and groups outside the region.

But one of EDC’s other primary roles is managing financing and securing deals for public works projects, such as a new transit station, in the South Central Waterfront neighborhood, south of the Congress Avenue, which would be paid for through a proposed tax. increase in reinvestment area. The TIRZ, which would channel property tax revenue increases in the area to infrastructure across the region, is still being discussed by the city council, with further progress not expected until July.

The wait means EDC cannot do any meaningful work on proposed improvements such as street widening or development-related utility issues, while projects such as the redevelopment of the former property of Austin American-Statesman Advance.

David Steinwedell, the longtime real estate professional who chairs EDC’s board, said he and other board members or staff can’t do much about the high profile neighborhood until the Council moved forward with the TIRZ which was discussed as a lifeblood. component of the neighborhood’s redevelopment for years.

“Without the TIRZ, there’s probably no role for EDC because they’re two intertwined things, and unfortunately we can’t accomplish much because we have to have that in place. There’s a lot of interest in ensuring that the South Central Waterfront can achieve a wide variety of goals, including what is going to happen with the lake and parks as well as affordable housing and cultural venues goals,” a- he said “There are a lot of moving parts and I think unfortunately because of the number of moving parts nothing comes close to the speed we want it to go while the private market is efficient and find ways to get things done.”

With new CEO Theresa Alvarez in place, EDC’s major projects include assisting with real estate transactions and related services related to two city parcels (known as Blocks 16 and 18) on East 11th Street, and the completed a real estate analysis of the Interstate 35 Reconstruction project, with a focus on equity issues.

Alvarez, who joined the group in February after spending his career in financial services at Wells Fargo, said the scope of EDC’s priorities are ambitious and will need to be assessed against the transactions it makes related to cultural spaces and affordability.

“In other cities, you might have an organization that’s just focused on what we’re doing with the cultural trust, and that might be a full-time organization. And you would probably see a south-central waterfront EDC, and it would just focus on the south-central waterfront,” she said. “Real estate investing will be our way of measuring success. We’re taking the city’s underutilized assets and making them valuable and delivering the community benefits we seek, whether it’s artistic venues, creating jobs, everything that this region needs and how it is determined.

With the evaluation of the cultural trust proposal advancing, Alvarez said the first grant recipients will be the first step in the pipeline of projects that EDC will seek to assist through municipal funds, future philanthropies and fundraising, or low-interest loans that she and others can help run arts groups.

“The idea is not just to hand out dollars. It creates the pipeline that goes to every artistic venue and every artistic group that has very unique specific needs in their offerings. We are looking at the question of how to leverage, connect and secure not just additional funding, but additional resources. »

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Augusta Airport Receives Infrastructure Funding – Butler County Times-Gazette https://supporttransit.org/augusta-airport-receives-infrastructure-funding-butler-county-times-gazette/ Sat, 23 Apr 2022 00:41:59 +0000 https://supporttransit.org/augusta-airport-receives-infrastructure-funding-butler-county-times-gazette/ By Times-Gazette staff Augsta Municipal Airport is on track to receive more than $159,000 in federal funds from the bipartisan infrastructure law passed earlier this year. It’s a fund that was highlighted by FAA Deputy Administrator Bradley Mims during his visit to the airport this week. “These communities may be small, but they have a […]]]>


By Times-Gazette staff

Augsta Municipal Airport is on track to receive more than $159,000 in federal funds from the bipartisan infrastructure law passed earlier this year.

It’s a fund that was highlighted by FAA Deputy Administrator Bradley Mims during his visit to the airport this week.

“These communities may be small, but they have a significant impact on the safe and efficient operation of our national airspace system. With this new funding, Augusta Municipal and airports across the country will be able to work on projects that have been waiting for years,” FAA Deputy Administrator A. Bradley Mims said during his visit to the airport. .

Augusta Municipal Airport is set to receive $159,000 in BIL funding for fiscal year 2022. This program enables investments in runways, taxiways, safety and sustainability projects, as well as terminals, airport transit links and road projects. The bipartisan Infrastructure Act invests $20 billion in airports across the country.

President Biden’s bipartisan infrastructure law sends investments to revitalize and rebuild small communities and municipalities across the country.

The infrastructure law includes investments in broadband internet, roads and bridges, drinking water, sanitation systems and electricity.

According to an FAA press release, the Biden administration is “committed to working with communities to help them access federal resources and improve transparency. In smaller cities across the country, like Augusta, the bipartisan Infrastructure Act provides funding, flexibilities, and historic benefits.

The FAA has listed the following benefits for small communities:

PROVIDING HIGH-SPEED INTERNET TO EVERY HOME:

More than 35% of rural Americans and tribal communities lack wired broadband access at acceptable speeds. The bipartisan Infrastructure Act invests $65 billion to make high-speed Internet available to all Americans, lower prices for high-speed Internet in all areas, and provide technical assistance to rural communities looking to expand the high debit.

CREATING WELL-PAYING JOBS CLEANING UP LEGACY POLLUTION IN RURAL COMMUNITIES:

The President is committed to (1) creating well-paying jobs in rural communities across

countries and (2) ensuring that these communities are safe and high quality places to live. Pollution inherited from industries that extracted natural resources from rural areas and left behind huge amounts of environmental degradation has stunted the economic growth and success of rural communities.

MAKING A HISTORIC INVESTMENT IN RURAL MOBILITY:

Limited access to transportation options in rural and remote areas hurts rural Americans’ access to jobs, basic services, and their communities at large. The bipartisan Infrastructure Act invests billions of dollars to ensure rural families can get where they need to go.

PROVIDING SECURE, HIGH-QUALITY ROADS AND BRIDGES TO RURAL COMMUNITIES:

While Americans living in rural areas make up only 20% of the population, they account for nearly half of all road deaths. The bipartisan Infrastructure Act will provide safer roads, bridges, crossings and other improvements essential to the quality and safety of our roads.

ENSURE CLEAN DRINKING WATER AND BASIC SANITATION IN EVERY HOME:

Across the country, including in rural and tribal communities, pipes and sewage treatment plants are aging and polluted drinking water is endangering public health. The Bipartisan Infrastructure Act’s transformative investment in our water and wastewater infrastructure will fundamentally change the quality of life for millions of Americans by eliminating lead pipes, providing essential access to sanitation, and more.

BUILDING RESILIENT COMMUNITIES NATURAL DISASTERS AND THE THREAT OF CLIMATE CHANGE:

Last year, the United States faced 22 extreme weather and climate disasters with losses of more than $1 billion, or a cumulative cost of nearly $100 billion. These included floods, fires and damaging windstorms in rural America. The bipartisan infrastructure law will improve the resilience of rural communities.



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Funding issue for BART extension in San Jose https://supporttransit.org/funding-issue-for-bart-extension-in-san-jose/ Fri, 22 Apr 2022 22:40:36 +0000 https://supporttransit.org/funding-issue-for-bart-extension-in-san-jose/ The Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority will need new sources of funding to pay for the BART extension to downtown San Jose, the agency said Friday, in its first public acknowledgment that the current budget to bring BART trains to across the country’s 10th largest city could be short by more than $1 billion. At […]]]>


The Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority will need new sources of funding to pay for the BART extension to downtown San Jose, the agency said Friday, in its first public acknowledgment that the current budget to bring BART trains to across the country’s 10th largest city could be short by more than $1 billion.

At a special VTA board meeting on Friday, Gregg Richardson, the agency’s chief financial officer, said the VTA planned to spend the coming months looking for ways to close the funding gap to reach the latest federal government cost estimate for the project is $9.15. billion.

“That’s not to say we believe that’s what the cost will be – but that’s the cap,” Richardson said. “If we can fund that, we’re confident the rest of the project can work.”

The VTA must show the federal government by October 2023 that it can line up an additional $1.66 billion – likely from other state and federal resources – or it risks losing the $2.3 billion commitment. dollars for the project taken last year by federal transit officials.

The latest setback for the highly anticipated BART project comes after the VTA spent months downplaying a Federal Transit Administration analysis, first reported by the Bay Area News Group, that the cost of the project could skyrocket. and construction could take until 2034 to complete. The official VTA budget for the project still stands at $6.9 billion with a completion date of 2030.

But VTA spokeswoman Bernice Alaniz said the agency now recognizes that rising raw material and labor costs are driving up prices.

“It’s just the way the current environment evolves and observes other mega projects,” she said. “We’re going to plan and prepare for that cap and do everything we can to bring it down.”

The new financial concerns come on top of more immediate budget issues already crippling the agency, which is relying on federal COVID relief money to balance its budget for South Bay’s light rail and bus service.

VTA officials said Friday the agency also anticipates problems paying BART to operate the current portion of the extension that runs through Santa Clara County via Milpitas and Berryessa in North San Jose.

VTA currently relies on a sales tax approved by voters in 2008 to pay the majority of BART’s operating costs, but these funds are expected to be insufficient to cover expenses. Alaniz said the agency was looking to move money from other parts of its budget to fill the gap, though it didn’t provide an estimate of the shortfall or an expected date when the costs of operation of BART will exceed sales tax funds. Last year, VTA paid BART $37 million.

The lack of funding raises questions about how VTA will bear the future costs of operating the six-mile, four-station BART extension. Santa Clara County’s current BART stations opened during the pandemic and struggled to attract riders — ridership was just 13% of pre-pandemic projections in March.

Alaniz said the agency is monitoring California’s burgeoning budget surplus as well as other federal funds. But there is competition for those funds, which will be targeted by other transit agencies in the state and nation. Alaniz said there are no plans at this time to seek additional money from Santa Clara County taxpayers.

The BART plan to Silicon Valley, managed by the VTA, is expected to be the largest infrastructure project in Santa Clara County’s history. The project was approved by nearly 71% of Santa Clara County voters in 2000. Voters approved two sales tax measures that together will provide about $4 billion for the expansion.

Despite support for the project, the expansion’s underground tunnel design has caused some controversy. The VTA and BART boards chose to use single-bore technology, which has never been used to operate a subway tunnel in the United States, to minimize the street-level disruption to downtown that a more conventional double-bore tunneling method. would require.

The Federal Transit Authority announced in October 2021 that it intended to earmark up to $2.3 billion in transit funds for the expansion, a quarter of the project’s final cost, according to the the lowest amount. President Joe Biden’s proposed budget released earlier this month provides $200 million of total federal funding.

Before providing VTA with full funding, the federal government gave the agency two years to issue tenders, determine the final price for the project, and complete a revised funding plan.

“There is a time constraint on the letter of intent, but we are working to make sure it will all be complete,” Richardson said.



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Arnold, Buffalo Township Receives $47.8 Million Share of Public Transportation Funding https://supporttransit.org/arnold-buffalo-township-receives-47-8-million-share-of-public-transportation-funding/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 22:38:05 +0000 https://supporttransit.org/arnold-buffalo-township-receives-47-8-million-share-of-public-transportation-funding/ Projects in two Alle-Kiski Valley communities are among 56 highway, bridge, transit, bicycle and pedestrian projects in 28 counties selected for $47.8 million in funding, announced Thursday the office of Governor Tom Wolf. • Arnold receives $53,000 for improvements to Rankin Street, from Woodmont Avenue to Freeport Road. Improvements include road paving and sidewalk improvements. […]]]>


Projects in two Alle-Kiski Valley communities are among 56 highway, bridge, transit, bicycle and pedestrian projects in 28 counties selected for $47.8 million in funding, announced Thursday the office of Governor Tom Wolf.

• Arnold receives $53,000 for improvements to Rankin Street, from Woodmont Avenue to Freeport Road. Improvements include road paving and sidewalk improvements.

“We thank the people of Harrisburg for their continued support in helping to repair our crumbling infrastructure,” said Mayor Arnold, Joe Bia. “We will continue on this path as much as possible, giving those who live and travel in our city roads and sidewalks safe to use.

“Any improvements we have been able to make have not resulted in additional charges to our local ratepayers.”

• The Township of Buffalo will receive just over $ 333,000 for improvements to the way Harvey. They include the improvement of an existing culvert, repaving the road and replacing a guide rail to meet current standards.

Bob Fletcher, the township road master, said the culvert repair a funnel under Harvey Road Creek near its intersection with Ekastown Road.

“The old guide rail is this old wire that’s been there for who knows when,” he said.

PennDOT evaluated funding requests and selected recipients based on safety benefits, regional economic conditions, technical and financial feasibility, job creation, energy efficiency and operational sustainability.

“Transportation is essential to link communities and economies, and we are an important partner to get things in the entire state,” said Wolf. “These investments will improve overall mobility and safety while strengthening commercial projects.”

The city of Pittsburgh was among the biggest recipients, getting $1.76 million. The money will be used to reopen part of Sylvan Avenue to pedestrian and bicycle traffic as a public pathway parallel to Route 885 that will connect the Hazelwood and Greenfield neighborhoods to Oakland employment centers, the office said. the governor.

PennDOT expects to accept funding applications in the fall for the 2023-24 fiscal year.

Brian C. Rittmeyer is a staff writer for Tribune-Review. You can contact Brian at 724-226-4701, brittmeyer@triblive.com or via Twitter .





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Edmonton councilors consider funding public transit with parking fees and real estate development https://supporttransit.org/edmonton-councilors-consider-funding-public-transit-with-parking-fees-and-real-estate-development/ Tue, 19 Apr 2022 22:42:35 +0000 https://supporttransit.org/edmonton-councilors-consider-funding-public-transit-with-parking-fees-and-real-estate-development/ Content of the article Council on Tuesday set out a shortlist of possible levers it could use to attract the money needed to operate Edmonton’s transit system, other than raising fares. Content of the article Transport consulting firm Leading Mobility offered a council committee 10 money-making tools to explore last week, including fuel taxes, charging […]]]>


Content of the article

Council on Tuesday set out a shortlist of possible levers it could use to attract the money needed to operate Edmonton’s transit system, other than raising fares.

Content of the article

Transport consulting firm Leading Mobility offered a council committee 10 money-making tools to explore last week, including fuel taxes, charging drivers for road use or fees for ride-sharing companies like Uber. Until the city decides what tools to use, he asked staff to give them more details on several of the 10 options: parking fees, real estate development, dedicated funding for public transit and new funding for community revitalization. The Council also considered other ideas in the report commissioned by the city such as vehicle registration fees and receipt of a portion of the provincial fuel tax, but this would require approval from the Government of Alberta.

Com. Aaron Paquette said it was clear they needed to diversify how they fund transit. The city must work to make public transit more attractive to more people — starting with safety and cleanliness — if it wants more people to use it, he said.

Content of the article

“There is no desire to increase rates without showing that we are increasing the level of our service,” he told the council.

Com. Michael Janz, the only councilor to oppose moving forward with the idea on Tuesday, said the ideas are not progressive.

“For us, looking at things like parking fees or vehicle registrations is like shaking our couch and hoping a few dollars come out,” he said. “I don’t think nickel-and-diming drivers will get us there.”

Mayor Amarjeet Sohi thinks some of these ideas could be helpful, but Edmonton needs continued investment from other levels of government if it wants ridership to grow.

“We need to build very strong advocacy with the provincial government and the federal government to provide us with long-term operational support for transit,” he told media outside the council chamber. “These tools we’re talking about are going to bring in a little bit of money here and there. They are not robust enough tools to build the kind of system we need.

Earlier this month, Edmonton received a combined $66.9 million for public transit from the provincial and federal governments to take into account shortfalls related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

lboothby@postmedia.com

@laurby





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The Most Effective Loans for Transportation Businesses in 2021 https://supporttransit.org/the-most-effective-loans-for-transportation-businesses-in-2021/ Mon, 18 Apr 2022 14:40:17 +0000 https://supporttransit.org/?p=3802 There have been many occasions: “Truck drivers keep America moving.” Although a few inexperienced people may consider this a sham, anyone who understands freight knows how accurate it is. For instance, 70% of the items consumed in the United States were shipped by truck. If America’s trucks were idle even for one single day, the […]]]>

There have been many occasions: “Truck drivers keep America moving.” Although a few inexperienced people may consider this a sham, anyone who understands freight knows how accurate it is. For instance, 70% of the items consumed in the United States were shipped by truck. If America’s trucks were idle even for one single day, the consequences could be devastating.

There are 3.5 million drivers of trucks within the United States. Additionally, 5.2 million other employees in the trucking industry never get into the truck’s cab. This is 8.7 million workers each day to keep the business humming. Although that might sound like a lot, it’s not enough. As per research, around 60,000 more drivers are required to meet the increasing demand.

Of course, no words are more appealing to business owners than “rising demands.” It’s just a matter of cash to grow your business in line. While purchasing several trucks might be an important business decision. However, it’s not as easy as visiting the local bank to obtain auto loans such as GAD Capital.

Finances can be a challenge for those who work in the trucking business. For starters, as you know, trucks are costly. New trucks can range between $130,000 and $180,000 with the trailer adding an additional $30,000-$80,000. To top it all off, trucking companies are usually thought of by lenders as a risky investment.

As you consider financing options for the new year is a good idea to explore your alternatives. When you’re trying to purchase an automobile, lease one, or even repair/upgrade your existing truck, it’s crucial to be aware of your alternatives.

Equipment Financing

On the first list first is the financing of equipment since it’s designed for the same expenses as trucks. With the maximum loan amounts reaching $5 million, it will allow you to purchase that brand-new Kenworth W990 that you’ve been eyeing. If the W990 isn’t available currently, equipment financing could enable you to buy the other equipment you need to move the freight.

The financing for equipment is relatively simple to obtain because your vehicle is likely to be used as collateral for the loan. This is good news since it means that you’ll be able to secure an amount higher on a loan, even if your credit or financial background is not as good. But be aware that it means that your vehicle may be taken away when you don’t keep up with your payments.

Term Amount

If you require trailers, trucks, or even a brand new application to run your business, term loans can help you get there. With amounts that range from $5,000 to 2 million dollars, you could get your cash within just a couple of days.

The interest rates can begin at around 6.6% when you borrow on term loans. Of course, it depends on your history’s credit score, your business’s history, and the loan amount required. Whatever the circumstances, you should plan for the duration of your loan to be between 5 and 10 years.

Short Term Loan

These loans are similar to credit cards, but they’re designed to be faster. You can have the cash you require in just 24-hours, and the time frame is three to five years.

It sounds great, doesn’t it? Be aware that you’ll have to pay a fee for the short-term loan. They are more expensive in terms of interest than a traditional term loan, and the maximum sum is less. If you find you need fast money, these types of loans will generally meet your needs.

SBA Loan

The US Small Business Administration (SBA) offers a range of loans with favorable rates. The loan’s good terms for borrowers is that SBA assures a substantial portion of the loan amount. This decreases risks for the lenders. This means the lenders are more willing to cooperate with you.

On the other hand, SBA loans are highly competitive. If you can qualify for them, they could take an extended time to get. There’s plenty of paperwork required, and the process can be lengthy.

Line of Credit

If you have to make purchases for equipment with lower costs, think about a company credit line. Instead of offering you a free sum of thousands of dollars, the line credit grants you access to an amount you can draw from whenever you require. Similar to credit cards, it is only charged for the amount you need to use.

The revolving method of financing is a good choice because it offers flexibility. For instance, if you’re experiencing an economic downturn or are waiting for many payments to get paid, your credit line could help make up the shortfall.

Suppose you research your loan options today so that you’re ready to make financial decisions in 2021. Keep in mind that regardless of whether you’re a seasoned business employing hundreds or trying to start your company up and running, there are various loan options available to those who need them.

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Merced County tax marks fifth year of transportation funding https://supporttransit.org/merced-county-tax-marks-fifth-year-of-transportation-funding/ Fri, 15 Apr 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://supporttransit.org/merced-county-tax-marks-fifth-year-of-transportation-funding/ Phase 1A of the Atwater-Merced highway was deemed complete on Friday, March 25, 2016, during a ceremony involving elected officials. The highway paved the way for the proposed Ferrari Ranch, a 3 million square foot development that includes retail stores, restaurants, a cinema, hotel and medical center. Thaddee Miller tmiller@mercedsunstar.com With Measure V marking its […]]]>


Phase 1A of the Atwater-Merced highway was deemed complete on Friday, March 25, 2016, during a ceremony involving elected officials.  The highway paved the way for the proposed Ferrari Ranch, a 3 million square foot development that includes retail stores, restaurants, a cinema, hotel and medical center.

Phase 1A of the Atwater-Merced highway was deemed complete on Friday, March 25, 2016, during a ceremony involving elected officials. The highway paved the way for the proposed Ferrari Ranch, a 3 million square foot development that includes retail stores, restaurants, a cinema, hotel and medical center.

tmiller@mercedsunstar.com

With Measure V marking its fifth year in April, Merced County leaders say the half-cent sales tax has been instrumental in improving roads, bridges, sidewalks and transportation networks in common premises.

The Merced County Association of Governments (MCAG) this week released a fifth anniversary edition of its annual Measure V report, titled moving. The report highlights that sales tax revenue has reached the milestone of $100 million collected.

V-measurement was adopted by Merced County voters in November 2016 and entered into force the following year. It was passed in hopes of generating more than $450 million over the next 30 years for transportation maintenance and improvements, according to the MCAG website.

The tax is set to expire in 2047.

“Measure V has done so much more for local transportation systems in its first five years than we even imagined,” MCAG Executive Director Stacie Guzman said in a press release Wednesday.

“Reaching the $100 million milestone as quickly as we did and seeing how much has been accomplished across the county in just five years is a testament to the magnitude of the need for these funds in our region.

This $100 million was raised for infrastructure projects to improve transportation in Merced County, the cities of Merced, Atwater, Dos Palos, Gustine, Livingston and Los Banos, as well as the public transit system The Bus. Funds have also been provided for major regional transportation projects in the east and west of the county.

Half of all Measure V revenue is allocated to the county and its six cities. These funds should be used for improving local transport and 20% should be spent on alternative transport such as sidewalk and cycle lane projects.

Here’s what Measure V funded, according to the report:

  • Merced County: Approximately $22 million in revenue received, $14 million spent in Spring 2022. Sidewalk projects at Henry Miller Avenue, Sandy Mush Road, Dickenson Ferry Bridge and Lobo Avenue are complete. The Atwater Merced Highway project is underway.
  • City of Merced: $9 million in revenue, $6 million in expenses. The funds were used to improve Main and M Streets, as well as repair sidewalks and potholes.
  • Atwater: $4 million in revenue, $514,000 in expenses. Improvements on Fruitland Avenue and Winton Way have been funded.
  • Dos Palos: $1 million income, $150,000 expenses. The city is using Measure to fix sidewalks and add bike lanes to roads.
  • gustin: $1 million income, $900,000 expenses. The city has become more pedestrian-friendly by repairing damaged sidewalks and adding a new multi-use path to a park.
  • Livingston: $2 million in revenue, $800,000 in expenses. The Mesure V project has improved the accessibility of the city with new ADA ramps, sidewalks and a multi-use path.
  • Los Banos: $4 million revenue, $2 million expense. The city has improved its roads, crosswalks and sidewalk ramps. A community neighborhood has been transformed into a pedestrian zone by modernizing the sidewalks.
  • Transit: $4 million income, $500,000 expenses. Measure V provides free, fixed-route transit service throughout the county to seniors, veterans, and ADA-eligible passengers on The Bus and other transit services. The funds will be used to transition the bus fleet to electric vehicles, with five new electric buses set to enter service at the end of 2022.

Future Measure V projects also include Atwater Merced Freeway Phase 1B which will extend the freeway to Santa Fe Drive, the Pioneer Road Project in Los Banos, Phase Three of the Meredith Avenue Multi-Use Trail in Gustine and a complete reconstruction of East Blossom Street in Dos Palos, according to the report.

The funds will also be used to acquire the first zero-emission battery electric vehicles to be added to The Bus’ fleet.

“There is no doubt that Measure V is a transformative program that will continue to shape how we travel within and between our communities for many years to come,” Guzman said in the report.

The full On the MoVe report is available online on the MCAG website or in hard copy at each of the six town halls, the county administration building and the MCAG office.

MCAG, as the designated local transportation authority for Merced County, is responsible for the implementation and administration of Measure V. MCAG posts monthly updates in an online newsletter available on its website web at www.mcagov.org.

This story was originally published April 15, 2022 5:00 a.m.

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Abbie Lauten-Scrivner is a reporter for the Merced Sun-Star. It covers the town of Atwater and the county of Merced. Abbie holds a Bachelor of Science in Journalism and Public Relations from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo.



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Pace piggybacks on Georgia e-bus order, approves funding for Homewood facility upgrade – Streetsblog Chicago https://supporttransit.org/pace-piggybacks-on-georgia-e-bus-order-approves-funding-for-homewood-facility-upgrade-streetsblog-chicago/ Fri, 15 Apr 2022 02:49:33 +0000 https://supporttransit.org/pace-piggybacks-on-georgia-e-bus-order-approves-funding-for-homewood-facility-upgrade-streetsblog-chicago/ Pace’s Board of Directors approved two major initiatives at its March 16 meeting. The council agreed to piggyback on the Georgia State Electric Bus Purchase Agreement with Proterra Inc., the Burlingame, CaliforniaNew York-based electric bus manufacturer, allowing Pace to deliver buses to the North Division, its routes serve Waukegan and adjacent suburbs, faster than originally […]]]>


Pace’s Board of Directors approved two major initiatives at its March 16 meeting. The council agreed to piggyback on the Georgia State Electric Bus Purchase Agreement with Proterra Inc., the Burlingame, CaliforniaNew York-based electric bus manufacturer, allowing Pace to deliver buses to the North Division, its routes serve Waukegan and adjacent suburbs, faster than originally planned.

Pace also approved an intergovernmental agreement with Metra to fund improvements to the Pace portion of the Metra/Amtrak/Pace multimodal station in the southern suburb of Homewood. Metra’s board of directors approved the contract at a meeting held at the same time.

While the Homewood station deal passed without any issues, the vote on piggybacking electric buses was pushed back in public comment. Marcos Feldman, principal researcher for the transit labor equity think tank Jobs to Move America Illinois, argued that in the interests of ensuring job opportunities and economic benefits for marginalized communities, Pace should propose the project. But Pace officials responded that with current supply chain issues and growing demand for electric buses, it was in the transit agency’s best interest to seize the opportunity to place itself in front of the line. Assuming there are no unforeseen delays, Pace might be able to put 20 electric buses on the road as early as next winter.

Electric buses

The final version of Pace Management of the Innovation strategic plan calls on the agency to make its bus fleet emissions-free by 2040. Budget 2022 allocated $10 million to purchase six electric buses and install charging stations at the North Division garage, which would be an improvement significantly compared to the two diesel-electric buses used at Highland Park. At Pace’s September 2021 board meeting, then-executive director Rocky Donahue said the goal was to convert all Northern Division routes to electric buses by 2026. The five-year capital plan called for Pace to purchase 52 additional electric buses during this period.

Current Pace executive director Melissa Metzger said the contract is worth $26.5 million, with Pace paying $1,245,530 per bus and the rest of the money covering charging infrastructure. She said the price per bus includes a two-year full bus warranty and a five-year propulsion warranty.

According to Proterra Press Release, the 40-foot ZX5 Max buses will offer “more than 13 megawatt hours of battery storage energy.” Metzger said Pace will be able to tell when a bus has run out of power in time to recharge it.

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A Proterra ZX5 bus.

She added that the buses will be delivered in the first or second quarter of 2023. “We will see the buses in 2023, hopefully, if there are no more parts shortages.”

Pace Board Chairman Richard Kwasneski said this pilot project will give the transit agency a chance to test the performance of electric vehicles in Chicagoland’s climate. He also thanked Metzger for closing the deal at relatively short notice.

In a statement, Proterra Chief Commercial Officer John Walsh said his company is “delighted to partner with Pace to bring our industry-leading fleet electrification solutions to the Chicagoland area. With our purpose-built vehicle platform and best-in-class lineup, we are excited to help drive the region’s transition to zero-emission electric transport.

Marcos Feldman said that Jobs for America tries to ensure that “taxpayer money [are] spent in a way that provides maximum benefit to all residents,” especially communities of color that often miss out on major development and infrastructure projects. While he said his organization appreciates Pace going all-electric, he feels that “by not using a competitive process to procure its first electric buses, Pace is missing a key opportunity to promote equity in employment opportunities and racial equity in the emerging electric vehicle industry. through your public purchases.

Feldman urged Pace not just to bid on the project, but to require bidders to comply with JTMA’s U.S. Jobs Plan, a “customizable, federally approved policy tool that creates good jobs and poverty.” equity in the public procurement process.” Within this framework, “bidders will be evaluated on the basis of their plans for the quality and location of jobs, the training and hiring of marginalized or disadvantaged workers, workers who have encountered barriers for those [well-paying] manufacturing jobs,” Feldman said. He noted that CTA has agreed to use the policy for three major purchasesand he encouraged Pace to follow suit.

Kwasneski defended piggybacking, saying that after speaking to several electric bus manufacturers during the November 2021 meeting American Public Transportation Association conference, he found that between supply chain issues and surging demand, it takes years for Pace to get electric buses unless they “queue up and get electric buses This year”.

Homewood Station Contract

The Metra Electric District line’s Homewood station also serves as the Amtrak station for the state-funded Illini and Saluki trains downstate from Carbondale, Illinois, as well as the city’s long-distance train from New Orleans to the Big Easy. Since MED trains are designed for high-level boarding, while Amtrak’s Superliner cars require ground-level platforms, each railroad has its own platform. An underpass connects the two platforms to the historic station and commuter car parks to the west of the tracks, and to the Pace transfer station to the east of the tracks.

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The existing Pace Bus Transfer Station in Homewood. Photo: Igor Studenkov

The Pace facility currently has two boarding platforms, one closest to the runways and the other in the middle. a smaller one main house leads to the tunnel while providing greater protection from the elements than bus shelters. Although the facility has the capacity to serve at least three routes, it currently serves two, routes 356 and 359.

Metra and Amtrak are currently working together to renovate the station, adding wheelchair ramps to both sides of the platform, increasing existing elevators, making the west side station ADA compliant, and constructing the new parking lot to compensate for lost parking spaces on the west ramp. The Pace part will benefit from the most extensive renovations, with a new covered ramp and a new station with toilets for bus drivers. All bus stops will be moved to the expanded west platform, but this will have three bays, preserving overall capacity and ensuring riders won’t have to cross a bus lane to make transfers. Bus shelters will also be replaced.

According to the presentation shared at the meeting, the renovation of the station costs $16.8 million. Under the agreement, Pace will reimburse Metra $2.81 million for the renovation of bus facilities.

Kwasneski said he was happy to see “another good project” that would improve both Metra and Pace facilities and improve accessibility.



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